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If the plaintext format is indeed as you describe, then you're out of luck: the insertion of the newlines and the consequent shifting of the plaintext records is enough to disrupt any structure in the ciphertext. If the plaintext were longer, say, 8 records, then it could work, but with just 7 records there's no way to switch the first and last record ...


3

$ROT(n)$ can be thought of as a character based stream cipher. It works because addition - the encryption method used - is commutative, i.e. $ROT(x, ROT(y, m)) = ROT(y, ROT(x, m))$. Another well known commutative function is $XOR$. It is used by the one time pad, but - more practically - also for block ciphers in streaming mode. So you can encrypt using AES ...


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It'll be the same situation that NY City suffered some days ago: when you have little variability on your data, i.e., they have a fixed-small size, it'll always be fast to brute force. You don't say how long your number is, so I'll assume it can range from 0 - 10,000,000,000 (so, a unique number for each human being on Earth today, plus some spare). You ...


1

Forming my comment into an answer: If the key has the same length as the message and is used only once, it is basically a One-Time-Pad. This means, that in theory you can match any ciphertext to any plaintext with $a key$. If this key has to match certain criteria (e.g. be a word of a certain language), the information theoretic aspect will be lost. It ...



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