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First, for practical applications this is pointless as even single encryption is considered unbreakable. Second, it's not needed for the keys to be different, but it may be useful for the algorithms to be different. From a crypto-mathematical standpoint this would look like the following with $K_1,...,K_6$ being the keys: ...


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With a OTP you need at least as much key material as you have plaintext. See Thomas' answer. That means you need a way to distribute as much key material as you have plaintext, securely. If you can do that, you can just distribute the plaintext over the same channel, and dispense with the OTP. The one situation where OTPs make sense is in time-delayed ...


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You need to understand that any variation on the OTP would ultimately be equivalent to the OTP security-wise, since it is unconditionally "secure" (the ciphertext leaks zero information about the plaintext or the key), and so you'd just making it harder to compute for now reason. So, sure, you can use the OTP, or some variant thereof, on 128-bit messages ...


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With a synchronous stream cipher (Sync SC), the stream is generated from the internal state, which is built from the key, and depending on the algorithm, a nonce. As the algorithm goes through its steps, the state is changed, and new stream bits are generated. If you want go get to the 11560th bit of stream, you have to start at bit 1 and go through all ...



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