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Are variable-length crypto hash functions still susceptible to collisions? Yes. Even if you choose an output length equal to the input length, you expect some collisions from even an ideal PRF. E.g., if my test code works: $\operatorname{SHAKE256}(\text{'6'}, 8) = \operatorname{SHAKE256}(\text{'8'}, 8)$. Is there any work done to show or prove ...


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Is there any work done to show or prove collision resistance gained by increasing digest length? Actually, as CodesInChaos has mentioned, the variable length versions of Keccak ("SHAKE128" and "SHAKE256") are known not to have any collision resistance beyond their security level, independent of how long we make the output. So, what's the point? So, as ...


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What you are describing is essentially the same things as a hash list. A hash list is a sequence of hashes over which another hash is calculated. Your scheme does the same thing after sorting. The sorting won't matter for the security of the scheme; it won't increase the chance of collisions. Hash lists are also used for a well known structure called a ...


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Sending a hashed password adds no value. Consider this, what the client sends after the hash is what the server considers as a password. Additionally; you are leaking an implementation detail on the client. SSL/TLS already ensure channel security; and then using a slow password hashing algorithm has already been proven to work. Precomputing the hash does not ...


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Short answer: don't. Use a password hash like PBKDF2, scrypt or bcrypt. Also, if at all possible, use a library that takes care of the low level stuff like password database for you. E.g. passlib might work if you use Python. I'm sorry if that sounds blunt, but that's how it is. To answer your actual questions: There is just only one thing which ...


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From that same document: In any case the minimal recommended length for K is L bytes (as the hash output length). So as long as the key is fully randomized, i.e. a cryptographically strong key, the time for brute forcing is at least the same or higher than the time finding a collision. If your key is indeed smaller or not fully randomized, then brute ...



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