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16

There are two important differences between AES-128 and AES-256: AES-128 has 10 rounds, AES-256 has 14 The key expansion process (that is, how they generate subkeys) is different If your AES-128 encryption hardware just takes a plaintext block and a 128 bit key, and produces a ciphertext block, well, no, there's not much you can do. In this case, the ...


8

It depends how the “AES-128 encryption hardware units” you mention are actually defined. I've already encountered processors that allow to independently compute AES operations such as $\texttt{SubBytes}$ and $\texttt{MixColumns}$ – which are the same regardless the key size involved (128 or 256 bits). In that case: yes, it can speed up the calculation for ...


5

I have argued so 15 years ago, and not been proven wrong since. Basically, A5/1, with a $n$-bit state, offers a resistance of roughly $2n/3$ bits of security. With $n = 64$, the resistance is very low, thus amenable to not only direct breaking, but also all kinds of trade-offs. All the attacks published so far are dances around that resistance level of ...



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