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Personally, I don't trust any measure of security that treats an RNG as a black box (ie only looks at the output stream). Detecting patterns in an output stream is a hard problem. Proving that there are no patterns in a finite sequence of numbers is (I suspect) provably impossible. Or more practically, for any given statistical test that you apply to my ...


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Short answer: Yes. If the PRNG is cryptographically secure and it generates a certain chunk of bits at a time, then any subset of the chunk generated by the PRNG should be just as "random" as the full chunk, but this would depend on the specific implementation of the CSPRNG. For certainty, I would refer to the full documentation of the API you're using. If ...


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Yes. Although the bit values are not identical per se (even given the same seed) you should use any of the 192 bits to form a 128 bit key - as long as you don't reuse any bits of course. If the 128 bits are not secure, then the 192 bits should also not be secure. AES keys consist of bits that are entirely random and thus unrelated, so generating a 192 bit ...



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