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3

A slight correction about terminology: The key is constant when you use CTR. The IV/counter affect the cipher input and so the keystream varies. The reason this can be decrypted is that the decrypter knows both the key and the IV/counter. They can calculate exactly the same function as the encrypter did, resulting in the same keystream block, which a XOR ...


9

You would not just need a mode of operation for what you're asking. What you need is a secure transport protocol. Probably the best well known one for TCP connections is TLS of course. For UDP connections you could use DTLS. If you have a shared key you could use one of the pre-shared key (PSK) variants. If you want to create your own transport protocol you ...


9

I would pick e) none of the above. None of those modes offers integrity protection, so unless integrity is handled elsewhere, your application is wildly insecure. An attacker could modify bits in transit and do nefarious things. Of the three, CFB and CTR are the worst for the application and should be very easy for an attacker to mount successful attacks, ...


3

Yes, this is secure. (one of the few cases where I'm pretty confident about this). Here are the arguments: Combining a secure (e.g. SUF-CMA) MAC with a secure (e.g. CPA-secure) encryption method in encrypt-then-authenticate is generally proven secure. This was shown in "Authenticated Encryption: Relations among notions and analysis of the generic ...



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