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3

Anyone who begins to develop an attack on primitive XYZ is probably not aware beforehand of what the computational complexity of their attack will turn out to be. Then, the attack is developed and computational complexity becomes known. Just because DES isn't broken by the attack in question does not mean no other ciphers will be. And just because the ...


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Differential cryptanalysis is a very powerful technique that permitted highly practical attacks on many ciphers that were not designed to resist it (e.g. FEAL-4). DES, as it turns out, was designed to be pretty resistant to it, which is why it requires an essentially impractical amount of chosen plaintexts to implement a differential attack on DES. ...


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I made a toy cipher that functioned in this manner. It had a bytewise transposition step that was performed by an invertible randomized permutation, similar to the Fisher-Yates shuffle, but easily invertible. Key material was used to select the next "random" index to shuffle, so as to enable decryption. At first, I really liked the idea, figuring that ...



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