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This sounds like "fair exchange," the subject of many good research papers. In general you need a third party to give any security guarantees, but "optimistic fair exchange" involves the third party only when one of the parties tries to cheat (i.e., when both play honestly there is no involvement from the third party). Incidentally, Diffie-Hellman is most ...


2

Agreeing with @otus but adding more background and context than I think belongs in comments: This is an OpenSSL question though you don't say so; all other SSL/TLS software I've looked at uses the RFC spellings DHE ECDHE DH_anon ECDH_anon, but OpenSSL was written yonks ago with EDH in some places (mostly the ones dating before ECC was introduced and there ...


1

According to RFC 5246 (and older standards), DHE means ephemeral Diffie–Hellman. EDH isn't a standard way to state it, but it doesn't have another usual meaning. I.e. all but the ECDH-* ones should have perfect forward secrecy. However, the export algorithms (EXP-*) are very weak, probably using only 40-bit keys. The other *-DES-CBC-SHA algorithms with ...



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