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14

For a real-world example of precisely the same ECB weakness leading to a massive password compromise, see the Adobe password database leak, as memorably illustrated in the xkcd web comic: $\hspace{83px}$ While there were several issues contributing to the scale of the compromise, one of them was that Adobe, instead of properly hashing the passwords, ...


12

It illustrates the point that the same plaintext going in to the cipher will result in the same ciphertext. It just happens to be a lot better example than showing someone abc387af de7231ab abc387af abc387af a129867e Now, what does this mean in the real world? If I gave you an email encrypted with AES-128 ECB, could you look at it and figure out the ...


8

DES has a block size of 8 bytes. Two blocks therefore come to 16 bytes. It looks like Adbobe were encrypting passwords using two blocks of 3-DES in ECB mode. Because all these passwords are eight bytes long, the second block is empty and is just filled with zeros. The second block gets started at all because of the string-terminating NUL character at the ...


6

The article mentions that 3-DES was used to encrypt these passwords in ECB mode. DES has a 64-bit/8-byte block. So let's say you use ECB to encrypt a nine byte password. The first 8-bytes are encrypted using ECB. So far so good. But what happens when we come to the ninth byte? Well we're now in a new block but only the first byte is populated with any ...


5

Note: I'll disregard the base64 encoding in the following text; the base64 encoding does not change the properties of the generated ciphertext. What you are running into is padding together with ECB mode. This padding can be any static padding. Most common is PKCS#5 padding, but zero padding is also possible. It is not possible to test which padding is ...


3

The reason why CBC is considered better than ECB has nothing to do with situations involving an attacker with a partial ciphertext; we always assume that any attacker has full access to the ciphertext. Instead, the problem with ECB is that it leaks information. Specifically, if you encrypt two messages which has two blocks of plaintexts in common, then ...


3

Yes, this is easy enough to exploit. Start by sending any 15-byte message $m$, and then 256 different 16-byte messages consisting of $m$ followed by each of the 256 possible values of the last byte. One of the encrypted 16-byte messages will have the same first ciphertext block as the encryption of $m$. Find out which, and you've found the first byte of ...


3

If there was a full 64-bit block of known plaintext, there would be a very fast attack using precomputation. You can build a precomputed table of all $2^{40}$ ciphertexts. Once you've got the precomputed table, recovering a key (given a ciphertext) would require just a single lookup in the table, so recovering a key would be extremely fast. Storing that ...


3

I think what you are looking for is a Password-Based Key Derivation Function (PBKDF). You can take a moderately strong password, like 12-14 random letters and numbers (no dictionary words though!), and throw it into the PBKDF function together with some other parameters, e.g. salt, number of iterations and the desired key length. After that you have a ...


3

As poncho said in his comment, you added padding before decryption as well, which is not correct. AES encryption and decryption are both permutations, so if you decrypt data with a key, it will "look" random (at least, if AES is secure). Instead of adding padding, you need to remove the padding from the already decrypted text: from Crypto.Cipher import AES ...


2

It is not practically possible. There are several attacks that are slightly faster than bruteforcing $2^{112}$ key candidates, but this is only a small factor. In some sense, they are bruteforce-like, since they require $2^{113}$ smaller steps.


2

What you are looking for is a Pseudo Random Function that should be indistinguishable from uniform, even if the key material that is passed to it is not. One potential problem with your scheme is that the AES key schedule is not particularly good at extracting the entropy from keys that are not selected (pseudo-)randomly, such as passwords and pass-phrases. ...


1

Search for passwords on IT Security and you will find tons of advice on how to store passwords, and how not to. Your scheme is not a good method for hashing passwords: it is a fast hash, it lacks any salt, and it unnecessarily limits the password length. People have studied this at great length: before trying to re-invent the wheel, I suggest you read up ...


1

Regarding your brute-force Blowfish attack: I believe I may be familiar with the protection scheme you describe. It turns out that it may be even more broken that you'd expect from the description, in that a) the actual keyspace may be rather more limited than 40 bits and b) the author may not have been terribly aware of the consequences of using the ...



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