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3

If the plaintext format is indeed as you describe, then you're out of luck: the insertion of the newlines and the consequent shifting of the plaintext records is enough to disrupt any structure in the ciphertext. If the plaintext were longer, say, 8 records, then it could work, but with just 7 records there's no way to switch the first and last record ...


-4

Well, DES is weak and since you can guess a plaintext you can use a rainbow table to crack the key and then of course decrypt and re-encrypt the message. Apart from that I don't think you can re-order the blocks to change the first and last line, if you really want to do this specific operation.


2

In the padding oracle attack you have an oracle that only tells you whether a particular chosen ciphertext decrypts to a correctly padded plaintext. That oracle is used to build a last word oracle, which used iteratively can reveal a whole message. The reason it works in CBC mode is that we can make predictable, arbitrary changes to the plaintext of the ...


2

…are any other modes of operation vulnerable to padding oracle attacks? Nope, it’s purely restricted to CBC. A padding oracle attack, also known as “Vaudenay attack” because it was originally published by Serge Vaudenay in 2002 and introduced at EUROCRYPT 2002, is an attack against cipher-block chaining. The attack works against any block cipher in ...


0

Padding Oracle attacks are mainly a problem in cases, where e.g. an encrypted message is modified and send to a target. These attacks try to measure the difference when decrypting and validating the message. The steps are: decrypting the message checking the padding > error if wrong checking or processing the data > error if wrong or format corruption ...


1

There are a couple of things going on: First of all, the DES key FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF happens to be a "DES weak key"; by that, we mean that if you send a block through the cipher twice, it'll end up with the original value; that is: $$X = DES_{weak}( DES_{weak} ( X ))$$ You are obviously encrypting in CBC mode with a zero IV. So, let us look at what ...


3

If the protocol doesn't provide authentication, an attacker can probably mount replay attacks or make deterministic changes to messages. If the nonces in different blocks are not compared in any way, they can just take the ID block of a previous message and use it with a new one, to forge it being from that device. If nonces are required e.g. to be equal in ...



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