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6

I purposefully did not look at the details of the change you are proposing because whatever the change is, the answer is a resounding YES. If you make any change to a cryptographic construction, then you must prove the security of the modified scheme. If you are lucky, you may be able to reduce the security of the modified scheme to the original scheme, or ...


2

The size we speak of with regard to elliptic curves is the size of the field over which the elliptic curve is defined. This is not necessarily exactly the size of the private key. For example: Curve25519 is a 255-bit elliptic curve and has, effectively, 252-bit private keys, though they are usually encoded as 256-bit values with four fixed bits. Public keys ...


1

No, it's no easier than the standard DBDH problem. Here's the reduction that shows that: suppose that we have an Oracle that solves your problem (given $g^s, g^y, g^r, g^t, g^{st-rs}, g^{(yr+d)/t}, e(g,g)^x$ is $e(g,g)^x = e(g,g)^{syr}$?) Now, suppose we're given $g^s, g^y, g^r, e(g,g)^x$, and are asked whether $e(g,g)^x = e(g,g)^{syr}$. What we do is ...


1

A.Toumantsev had it right in his comment that 'it depends'; I'll try to expand on that. First of all, there's no one 'window method', there are a bunch of different variations, and which $w$ works best for you would depend on the exact version you're using. With the most basic window method, to compute $a^e \bmod p$, you: compute $a^0 \bmod p, a^1 \bmod ...



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