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5

Yes, there are several ways in which Mallory could pretend to be Amy. One obvious way, which doesn't even involve Amy herself in any way, would be for Mallory to perform steps 1 and 2 of the protocol normally, as if he were Amy. Then, given Betty's nonce $n_b$, Mallory can start a second, parallel instance of the protocol, again pretending to be Amy, and ...


4

The reference for this is NIST SP800-38A, especially its appendix B. Basically we consider the IV a binary value of the width of the block cipher (64-bit for DES, 128-bit for AES), and add 1 to that, except for one detail: there is no carry at some application-specified rank, defining the maximum number of blocks that can be enciphered with a single IV; if ...


3

In CTR, you can use any operation which has a full cycle through the space of the IV with the counter. You could use the plus operator like the example: $69dda8455c7dd4254bf353b773304eec + 1 = 69dda8455c7dd4254bf353b773304eed$ To calculate the next value, just again add 1. You could also use a increasing counter and xor it with the original IV: ...


3

GMAC is quite simply GCM mode where all data is supplied as AAD (or additional authenticated data), or as NIST SP 800-38D puts it: If the GCM input is restricted to data that is not to be encrypted, the resulting specialization of GCM, called GMAC, is simply an authentication mode on the input data. If you don't have access to a cryptographic provider ...


3

Yes, because Mallory can use Amy and Betty to get any encrypted nonce; Amy and Betty are oracles for Mallory. She just has to send the nonce she has to encrypt to either one of them and they perform the task for her (in another "authentication attempt", using step 1 & 2). Usually you protect against this kind of situation by performing an encryption ...


2

Your idea is no stronger than simply having a common shared password $P_1$ from which the symmetric encryption key is derived. If Alice encrypts a message with Bob's hashed password, even if someone knows the shared password, only Bob can decrypt the message You assumed the hash of Bob's password – $H(B_1)$ – is public, so if Eve knows both it and the ...


2

Well, 32 bits is somewhat short, so one could just try ciphertexts. However, there is a much better attack. Choose M0 arbitrarily, let P be the CBC padding for Headers || CRC || M0, and choose M1 so that CRC( M0 || P || M1 ) = CRC(M0). Submit M0 || P || M1 to be encrypted, truncate the ciphertext to the length of encryptions of M0, and then output the ...


2

First, using only a single SHA512 to hash the password is not enough. You should use something like bcrypt with a long salt to store user password "hashes". A simple SHA512 can be attacked quite powerful with a dictionary attack, just trying millions of possible passwords and calculating the SHA512 hash for that until one matches. Concerning the encryption ...


2

There are two possibilities here: AES is secure, in which case no one can open your encryption without knowing your keys, regardless of whether you layer anything else on top of AES. AES is not secure and someone knows how to break it. In that case the security of your encryption might only be as strong as the second layer of encryption. In neither case ...


2

If the plaintext format is indeed as you describe, then you're out of luck: the insertion of the newlines and the consequent shifting of the plaintext records is enough to disrupt any structure in the ciphertext. If the plaintext were longer, say, 8 records, then it could work, but with just 7 records there's no way to switch the first and last record ...


1

The problem is almost exactly the same as in password based key derivation, so you could use a similar solution. Derive a master secret from your password and a unique salt using e.g. PBKDF2 or scrypt: $S_m = PBKDF(p, s)$. Derive a site-specific secret from the master using e.g. HKDF and the site URL: $S_u = HKDF(S_m, u)$. Turn the site secret into a ...


1

Its of course doable. Please be referred to this paper for more details.


1

In general, you cannot, because padding makes sure the plaintext can always be recovered, so any valid padding method produces equally valid plaintext. For instance, suppose the last (decrypted) block is, in hexadecimal notation: 01:02:03:04:05:06:07:08:09:0A:0B:0C:0D:FF:00:00 The "natural" interpretation is that the padding method here might be "add an ...


1

I second the suggestion of a strong password based KDF, e.g. PBKDF2 or scrypt, which you use to derive the encryption key(s) from the user's password. Additionally, use authenticated encryption (e.g. either AES GCM or AES CTR + HMAC). If you can't open the encryption using the key derived from the password they enter, you know the password was wrong. No ...



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