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1

The "logic" of the Enigma machine and the development of the Polish solution, in principle, are well described in David Kahn's "Seizing The Enigma". There may be better descriptions that have come out since, but I found this very clear and continue to recommend it. In addition to the nuts and bolts of the machine itself, Kahn describes the history from ...


14

The example is using a shorthand notation for the rotors that somewhat obscures the way they actually work. For example, the first rotor in your example, BDFHJLCPRTXVZNYEIWGAKMUSQO, actually applies the following permutation of the alphabet: ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ ↓↓↓↓↓↓↓↓↓↓↓↓↓↓↓↓↓↓↓↓↓↓↓↓↓↓ BDFHJLCPRTXVZNYEIWGAKMUSQO Applying this rotor in the ...


6

This example is correct. The inversed versions are the inverse permutation; that is, if the forward direction is the permutation $P$, then the inverse permutation $P^{-1}$ has the property that $P^{-1}(P(X)) = X$ for all $X$. That is, if $X$ is a plaintext letter, and we run it through in the forward direction (giving us $P(X)$), and then run it through in ...


2

Every classical cipher can be used without a computer's assistance; while simple mechanical ciphers can fall into the "classical cipher" category, in general classical ciphers are pen-and-paper ciphers, almost all of which are more secure than your "press the key to the right of the real one." Vigenere, for instance, has flaws; however, it is much more ...



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