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There is some software available for the isogeny key exchange. It was developed by one of the designers of the key exchange (DeFeo). It is available on GitHub her: https://github.com/defeo/ss-isogeny-software/ The key exchange was first published in late 2011 and its security has held up under analysis since then. A 2014 paper from Indocrypt supports ...


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Ask yourself if you even can securely store the user's data. This includes to check that the user won't get sniffed by the root / admin user.Also make sure that your implementation is secure.Employ standard code review mechanisms, make sure that your implementation has countermeasures against timing attacks (like against AES).Also make sure that you use ...


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A nonce ensures that the same plaintext will always be mapped to different ciphertexts using the same key. Schemes requiring a nonce should always get a nonce, even for file-encryption you can't guarantee that your users won't encrypt the very same file twice, for reasons only known to them. Now to answer your questions: Authenticated encryption (AE) is ...


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One of the important properties of a modern cryptographic algorithm is that it resist distinguishing attacks. Distinguishing attacks are any way to tell the encrypted data apart from random data. So if you can tell what the algorithm used was simply by looking at the ciphertext the algorithm is vulnerable to this attack. Unless there is a header or such ...


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Find a key and decrypt all the files? Definitely not, if it's proper encryption. Still, if the encryption does not properly seed itself, or take at least some sort of steps to make it non-deterministic, then the attacker may be able to glean some information from the other files. For example the encryption might do things in block sizes of 1024-bits. If ...


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No an attacker can't (if the encryption is any good). If an attacker would be able to do this he'd be able to mount a known-plaintext attack against the cipher/mode combination, which is infeasible for most ciphers (AES,...) and modes (GCM,CTR,...).


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One would certainly hope not; if he can, then we would consider the encryption method "broken". One of the things we expect from any encryption method is the resistance to a "known plaintext attack" (of which your question is an example); that is, even if he is given a number of plaintext/ciphertext pairs, he still is unable to decrypt another ciphertext ...



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