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If you are using an AES library that has not undergone the FIPS validation process, then you are not FIPS compliant (or, at least, your use of AES is not). FIPS compliant means more than "we use algorithms that FIPS likes", it means "having passed the FIPS certification process"; that is how NIST defines it. Sorry, but NIST is quite strict about this; if ...


5

FIPS 140-2 only certifies cryptographic modules, not entire systems. So, to tell if your system is 140-2 compliant, it must be using a 140-2 certified module. NIST publishes a list of all FIPS 140-2 certified cryptographic modules. It is important to remember, though, that 140-2 certification does not certify that the module is used in a secure manner. From ...


4

Q1: Why are these tests stroked out? These tests are stroked out on pages 57-58 of the current FIPS 140-2 because they are no longer part of the current FIPS 140-2 standard, since Change Notice 2 of 2002 December third, where these pages belong. My guess for the rationale of removing these tests is that It was realized that the very principle ...


3

I can't help you with your Windows question, however I can chime in on FIPS: Is it going to be FIPS 140-2 compliant? It might not be. The problem is the "SHA1 for hashing"; SHA1 is no longer approved as a collision resistant hash function. On the other hand, HMAC-SHA1 is still approved as a Message Authentication Code. That is, if you are using SHA1 ...


3

No you don't need to use an IV. However, this limits you to ECB mode only — the only one which doesn't use an IV — and your CAVP (Cryptographic Algorithm Validation Program) AES certificate will indicate so.


3

Take a look at FIPS 140-2 Annex A. It lists the following: Symmetric Key AES, Triple-DES, Escrowed Encryption Standard Asymmetric Key DSA, RSA, ECDSA Hash Standards SHA-1, SHA-224, SHA-256, SHA-384, SHA-512, SHA-512/224, SHA-512/256 Random number generators See annex c Message authentication CCM, GCM, GMAC, CMAC, HMAC


3

This page gives details of a successful extraction of a 3DES key from an IBM 4758 (FIPS 140-1 Level 4): http://www.cl.cam.ac.uk/~rnc1/descrack/. In summary, it required 20 mins of access to the device, 2 days of (offline) cracking time, and about $1000 in equipment. Not sure if this quite answers the question you were asking in that it relies on ...


3

FIPS 140-2 Security Level 2 does not require any form of security measure to prevent extraction of secrets. It simply requires tamper evidence, that is, it should be possible to notice that such attack took place by looking (for instance) at some seal on the device or at a log file. To answer your question, extracting a secret may therefore take 0 seconds ...


2

The current list of FIPS-approved cryptographical methods is here. For encryption, we're limited to AES, 3DES (known as TDEA in FIPS-speak), and EES (Skipjack). As for signing algorithms, we have RSA, DSA and ECDSA. Note that the list of FIPS-approved algorithms does change at times; not extremely frequently, but more often than they come out with a new ...


2

The variables a, b, c, d, e, f, g, h are assigned on each round of the compression function main loop, but the interim hash values are considered only per message chunk (i.e. after all rounds have completed) I found the Wikipedia pseudo-code easier to understand than the description in your question, and it is clear there how the variables relate to interim ...


2

The rationale for no longer mandating these tests include: These tests are generally not useful against most FIPS 140-2 approved random number generators. These tests can be useful against some kind of entropy sources. These tests give frequent false positives every few thousandth block of truely random stream will fail the test. Some entropy sources are ...


2

It is possible to have product based on this algorithm suite, which is FIPS 140-2 compliant. However, there are special considerations for use of SHA-1 and RSA. The algorithm suite is partially considered obsolete and not FIPS 140-2 approved. For information on NIST transition to 112 bit cryptography you can read G.14 at FIPS 140-2 Implementation ...


1

Foreword atsec IT security blog recently commented about FIPS and NIST rules with: "As technology moves on, and the pace of change increases, with no real update to the specification for a decade, FIPS 140-2 is creaking badly. To deal with this, the CMVP must issue Implementation Guidance (I.G.), which is now so complex that it is virtually impossible to ...


1

You cannot tell anything related to FIPS 140 by looking at a key or by looking at a file. FIPS 140 doesn't say anything about the choice of encryption algorithm, other than requiring that all every encryption algorithm must be “approved security function” (as defined in the glossary) and there must be at least 1. FIPS 140 is all about the module, i.e. the ...


1

This requirement is a part of the general "continuous tests", and as such it's primary purpose is to detect "flatline" failures (if you can torture that analogy into making sense). Remember that FIPS-140 was originally written with hardware implementations in mind, so the approaches they take for testing sometimes seem odd for software since hardware ...



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