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9

Are the results as ground breaking as the article suggests? This result will prove to be a very important one for theoretical crypto. The analogy to fully homomorphic encryption (mentioned above by Samuel) is useful, since that is another well-known result that was hugely groundbreaking from a theoretical point of view, but even years later the ...


8

Wanted to add some to Mikero's answer. There are three main contributions of the research A proposed indistinguishability obfuscation for NC1 circuits where the security is based on the so called Multilinear Jigsaw Puzzles (a simplified variant of multilinear maps). Pair the contribution in 1 with Fully Homomorphic Encryption and you get ...


5

Some general categories that come to mind: Same functionalities from less extreme assumptions; in particular, from falsifiable ones. For example, the FE for Turing machines in GKPVZ requires SNARKs and extractable witness encryption, both of require less plausible "knowledge-type assumptions." See Gentry/Wichs Or taking the above further: ...


4

PE is a subclass of FE. This (from the other answer) is correct. Also, from my understanding, your analogy is correct. PE returns the plaintext if the predicate evaluates to true. FE, on the other hand, returns a function of the plaintext. We can say that PE is a subclass of FE, since we can use FE to implement PE. Just use the identity function. ...


1

It depends on what you are interested in, when building your expression. If you want to optimize for speed and/or expression size, then the problem is hard, and no good solution is known. You can either try to enumerate all expressions, looking for a match with your table (this is exponential in the size of the expression, so it becomes prohibitive real ...


1

Existing definitions for functional encryption don't support "combining" ciphertexts in the way that you suggest. As far as doing more than just access control, two very recent papers (to appear next month at STOC 2013) achieve functional encryption for arbitrary functionalities: Attribute-Based Encryption for Circuits by Gorbunov, Vaikuntanathan, Wee ...


1

My understanding of this is as follows: Monotonic access structure: if $\mathbb{A}$ is a set of attributes satisfying an access structure $T$, then any $\mathbb{A}'$ such that $\mathbb{A} \subset \mathbb{A}'$ also satisfies $T$. For example, consider $T = A \cap B$, then both $\mathbb{A}=\{A,B\}$ and $\mathbb{A}'=\{A,B,C\}$ satisfy $T$. Non-monotonic ...


1

Simply speaking, if any superset of the set satisfying the access structure satisfies the access structure, we call the structure monotonic. Let $\{1,2,...,n\}$ be a set of indices. An access structure is a collection $\mathbb{A}$ of non-empty subsets of $\{1,2,3,...,n\}$. We say a collection (or an access structure) $\mathbb{A} \subseteq 2^{\{1,2,...,n\}}$ ...


1

PE is subclass of FE. For more description,see page number 256 of book, Theory of Cryptography: 8th Theory of Cryptography Conference, TCC 2011.



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