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3

The strength here depends on the collision resistance of $H$. If $H$ is not collision resistant, like MD5, then the attacker can find $H(m) = H(m')$, ask for the MAC of one message and forge it for the other. So for many secure hashes you lose half the security bits. E.g. SHA-256 should give you a 256-bit secure HMAC, but would be at most 128-bit secure in ...


3

Should be comparable in strength to $H(m||k)$. The weakness is that a collision in the inner hash breaks the MAC. Using strong hashes the strength in bits is $\min(2^{n_O},2^{{n_I}/2})$ where $n_O$ is the output size of the outer hash and $n_I$ the output size of the inner hash. But since cryptoanalysis usually breaks collision resistance long before it ...


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In general, you never want to use CRC/weak checksum for any computations on secret material (like keys). CRC is a linear function and by showing CRC of a key, you reveal a lot of equations that hold among the key bits. This is equivalent to showing the same number of bits of the key as the length of the checksum. The proper way of doing it has been ...



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