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11

MD5 and SHA-1 have a lot in common; SHA-1 was clearly inspired on either MD5 or MD4, or both (SHA-1 is a patched version of SHA-0, which was published in 1993, while MD5 was described as a RFC in 1992). The main structural differences are the following: SHA-1 has a larger state: 160 bits vs 128 bits. SHA-1 has more rounds: 80 vs 64. SHA-1 rounds have an ...


8

No, because even SHA-512 was considered overkill from a security perspective. It has 256-bit collision resistance, which is unbreakable. (The link is about keys but a similar argument applies.) If you think large quantum computers will be efficient, a 512-bit hash makes some sense, but even then a 1024-bit one wouldn't. A quantum computer requires ...


8

What Richie Frame describes above is correct. This is how most FDE solutions work. A new random encryption key is created whenever new container is created or disk is encrypted. That encryption key (often called Master Key) is then protected by users' password. In case of Truecrypt, master key is stored in volume header (link) and volume header is encrypted ...


8

I don't see any obvious security problems in your approach. You can look into key derivation functions, that can provide some additional security in case one of the following occurs: Your password leaks Your secret number leaks A weakness is identified in the hash function There is a few usability issues, that would have to be addressed as well: ...


5

SHACAL-2 is a block cipher. One way compression functions are typically using block ciphers as a building block, but add some simple operation that make the function one way. In the case of SHA-256, the compression function is SHACAL-2 in Davies-Meyer mode. SHA-256 in turn, consists of this compression function with Merkle-Damgård padding and chaining. ...


5

What you are describing is essentially the same things as a hash list. A hash list is a sequence of hashes over which another hash is calculated. Your scheme does the same thing after sorting. The sorting won't matter for the security of the scheme; it won't increase the chance of collisions. Hash lists are also used for a well known structure called a ...


5

Is there any work done to show or prove collision resistance gained by increasing digest length? Actually, as CodesInChaos has mentioned, the variable length versions of Keccak ("SHAKE128" and "SHAKE256") are known not to have any collision resistance beyond their security level, independent of how long we make the output. So, what's the point? So, as ...


4

On the non technical side, the main reason for choosing PBKDF2 or BCrypt is that they're commonly used. This means they have seen more analysis, reducing the risk of a dumb mistake and it's easier to defend them when somebody questions your choice. What I dislike about your third variant is that it does not separate the different inputs. This isn't an issue ...


4

It mainly depends on how the algorithm was selected. If it was selected by a public competition like for AES, then it is likely to be secure. If it was forced in by the NSA such as Dual-EC random number generator, then you may have some doubts. Other questions you may want to ask yourself are: Is this an "original" algorithm or was the problem that it ...


4

I worked on a browser extension similar to what you are proposing for a tech company. There's also a project out of Stanford called PwdHash. Such schemes are nice, because they do increase the entropy of the generated password and make dictionary attacks more difficult. The main problem I ran into were pragmatic ones. The solution works 99% of the time, ...


3

The Secure Hash Standard and corresponding FIPS-180/202 do not specify any hash to meet a security requirement above 256-bits (using a 512-bit hash). This is unlikely to change. SHA-2 was built with state and word sizes to meet the security requirements on commodity computers (x86 and Alpha), which use 32 and 64-bit maximum CPU word sizes for general ...


3

In general signature creation contains the hashing part within the algorithm. A signature algorithm may also contain a padding mechanism such as PKCS#1 v1.5 or PSS for RSA. Finally it contains a one-way trap door function (modular exponentiation within RSA). Encryption has other requirements, and uses a different padding mechanism. Basically you are ...


2

I don't see what you want to accomplish. Since there is randomness involved, it's not something that lets you deduce the passwords on another computer if you don't have the 1000 digit random number. Thus, you need to take the random number with you in a secure container (or transmit it in some other safe way). In that case, you might as well just store and ...


2

encrypt it with the message author's private key This statement makes me uncomfortable. Normally, in asymmetric cryptography, one encrypts with the public key and signs with the private key. Did you mean “sign it with the message author's private key”? Otherwise, I would not accept your protocol without a clear, detailed explanation of what encryption ...


2

A symmetrically encrypted hash is not a secure MAC. You should use either an authenticated encryption scheme or a secure MAC in encrypt-then-MAC. With asymmetric encryption, it may be secure – "encrypting" with the author's private key means you are actually signing the message which is fine. However, you need to use the actual asymmetric primitive, not ...


2

Is it necessarily a peer review process? Does an algorithm need to withstand exploit attempts for N amount of time by M many experts? Or, is there a mathematical proving process that security experts can apply on their own to evaluate an algorithm? Yes, yes, and sometimes. Some algorithms can be proved secure under certain assumptions. However, ...


2

That Wikipedia article is full of errors and false claims. Most importantly, FSB has not been proven to be as hard as an NP-complete problem. This is because the syndrome decoding problem is NP-hard in the worst case, but FSB uses random instances of the problem. Indeed, these random instances may be much easier to break than arbitrary instances. There is no ...


2

Are variable-length crypto hash functions still susceptible to collisions? Yes. Even if you choose an output length equal to the input length, you expect some collisions from even an ideal PRF. E.g., if my test code works: $\operatorname{SHAKE256}(\text{'6'}, 8) = \operatorname{SHAKE256}(\text{'8'}, 8)$. Is there any work done to show or prove ...


1

The answer is in the CEN-EN 14890-1:2009, 7.3 General Aspects, and in the SHA-1 and SHA-2 specifications. The output of the hash algorithm for both SHA-1 and SHA-2 is the state of the hash algorithm (specified by $H^{(0..N)}_x$), after the last block is processed. So the output size is identical to the running state, possibly truncated to the leftmost bits. ...


1

My personal opinion: "proven secure" is more of an advertising slogan than anything else. The one-time pad and certain multiparty protocols can be shown to have some kind of information-theoretic security; these are exceptions to the rule. "Don't roll your own crypto" is still sensible advice however. For the rest of this discussion, I'll try and stick to ...


1

Note that for Rainbow tables you should use different reduction functions for each column. Once you have a match on chain endpoint, you should get the start point of this chain and regenerate chain up to hash value you're looking for. This will give you the plaintext you're looking for. To search for a matching chain, you guess the column $i$ where you ...


1

It depends on what properties the compression function has, which in turn depends on how the hash function was constructed. In hash functions based on the Merkle–Damgård construction, the compression function is required to be collision, preimage and second preimage resistant, just like the hash function itself. The only difference is input length: the ...


1

There are good reasons to think an algorithm being in Suite B is evidence NSA thinks it's secure (they are used to protect classified materials). There are also reasons to think algorithms they recommend for others may not be (it's happened before). So I don't think you can objectively say much about an algorithm either way just on the basis of whether it's ...


1

If the master key is strong (e.g. random 256-bit key), $c=1$ is fine, or you can use HKDF. A high number of iterations is only needed when you derive the key from a password or other low entropy string. If you can store a 4000 element table securely, you could just use random keys instead of derived ones. If you need the derived key to depend on a low ...


1

There is some confusion in your question, because a signature in a public key cryptosystem is (usually) not just a hash, but a hash of the message that is signed using the private key. E.g. in RSA it would be a hash value padded and raised to the private exponent. There are two ways to have an authenticated encryption in a public key system: Should we ...



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