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9

Expanding then shrinking in SHA-1 refers to the process, performed for each round (each 512-bit block of padded message), of message expansion from 512 bits to 2560 bits; keeping only 160 bits of state for the next round. The later directly follows from the construction of SHA-1 as a Merkle-Damgård hash of 160 bit. The former occurs because SHA-1's ...


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I know SHAKE128 and 256 are part of the SHA-3 standard but is the SHA3 standard officially released yet? i can only find a draft of the publication, does this mean it's not official and therefor not proven to be secure? No, SHA-3 has not been formally approved. On the other hand, what do you mean "not proved to be secure"? Do you really thing that ...


2

I'll consider only a non-adversarial model for the requirement of a low collision probability; that is, we are considering naturally-occurring strings only (which implies they are of bounded size; I'll limit it to $2^{64}-1$ bits, over 2305 Petabyte). However I'll consider that we need to reliably detect strings that differ only in a small consecutive ...


1

It seems to me that you don't need a cryptographic hash function, that is, a function that provides preimage resistance, collision resistance, etc. or at least to the degree that cryptographic applications require. Anyway, it seems that you could use a hash function that follows the Merkle-Damgard construction, but without doing the length padding at the ...


1

It depends. If you have full control over the whole system, all components and can use whatever algorithm you want to deploy, you can stick to the one giving you the best efficiency which fulfills your security requirements. In this case, it would be Tiger. However, Tiger has a 192 bit output. If that is not enough for you, go for SHA256. However, if the ...


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Yes, there's an issue: you're adding needless complexity, which gives you absolutely no benefit. The whole point of a PBKDF is to be slow; passwords are low-entropy, and the only way to mitigate brute-force is to make it take time to compute hashes. It can't take too long to log in, so you have to balance "fast for a user" and "slow for an attacker." ...



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