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The definition of perfect hash functions do not have any security/cryptographic requirements. For example, the hash function that simply outputs the first n bits of any string is a perfect hash function on the set of n bit strings. Obviously this function does not hide the input at all. So the answer to your questions is that it depends on the hash ...


5

A "generic attack" against a cryptographical primitive is one that can be run independently of the details of how that cryptographical primitive is implemented. The most obvious case is a cipher that takes an $N$ bit key; the generic attack of brute force takes a ciphertext, and attempts to decrypt it with all $2^N$ keys; when we find the known (or ...


3

Instead of rolling your own, you should use PBKDF2, which does what you try, but right. Alternatively use scrypt or maybe bcrypt, they try to be more expensive on GPUs and custom cracking hardware. (this will take about a million times longer compared to the usual method of calling a single hash function) If you used $n=10^9$, brute force would take a ...


3

I prefer using definitions that explicitly specify who does what. Weak collision resistance: After Bob creates some message x1, it is "computationally infeasible" for an attacker Mallory to compute some other message x2 such that h(x1) == h(x2). Strong collision resistance: It is "computationally infeasible" for an attacker Mallory to find any two messages ...


2

First, I must warn you that any definition that uses "feasible" will not be a rigorous one. The only way I know to rigorously define collision and preimage resistances is using function families, i.e. keyed hash functions. That said, if you believe the negations are equivalent, the definitions you are using are themselves equivalent (you correctly negated ...


2

Is appending the hash of the plaintext to the end of an encrypted message sufficient to ensure integrity? Not in the sense of authentication. Such a construction is malleable for many reasonable encryption algorithms. It also leaks the plaintext to anyone who can guess it, since they can calculate $h(P_i)$ for guesses (brute force or dictionary attack) ...



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