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8

No, because even SHA-512 was considered overkill from a security perspective. It has 256-bit collision resistance, which is unbreakable. (The link is about keys but a similar argument applies.) If you think large quantum computers will be efficient, a 512-bit hash makes some sense, but even then a 1024-bit one wouldn't. A quantum computer requires ...


4

It mainly depends on how the algorithm was selected. If it was selected by a public competition like for AES, then it is likely to be secure. If it was forced in by the NSA such as Dual-EC random number generator, then you may have some doubts. Other questions you may want to ask yourself are: Is this an "original" algorithm or was the problem that it ...


3

The Secure Hash Standard and corresponding FIPS-180/202 do not specify any hash to meet a security requirement above 256-bits (using a 512-bit hash). This is unlikely to change. SHA-2 was built with state and word sizes to meet the security requirements on commodity computers (x86 and Alpha), which use 32 and 64-bit maximum CPU word sizes for general ...


1

Is it necessarily a peer review process? Does an algorithm need to withstand exploit attempts for N amount of time by M many experts? Or, is there a mathematical proving process that security experts can apply on their own to evaluate an algorithm? Yes, yes, and sometimes. Some algorithms can be proved secure under certain assumptions. However, ...


1

Note that for Rainbow tables you should use different reduction functions for each column. Once you have a match on chain endpoint, you should get the start point of this chain and regenerate chain up to hash value you're looking for. This will give you the plaintext you're looking for. To search for a matching chain, you guess the column $i$ where you ...


1

It depends on what properties the compression function has, which in turn depends on how the hash function was constructed. In hash functions based on the Merkle–Damgård construction, the compression function is required to be collision, preimage and second preimage resistant, just like the hash function itself. The only difference is input length: the ...


1

There are good reasons to think an algorithm being in Suite B is evidence NSA thinks it's secure (they are used to protect classified materials). There are also reasons to think algorithms they recommend for others may not be (it's happened before). So I don't think you can objectively say much about an algorithm either way just on the basis of whether it's ...



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