Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

17

In short: You must authenticate the IV. Which particular attacks apply if you don't depends on the block cipher mode; I will give two common examples. In CTR mode, an attacker who fiddles with the IV can forge authenticated messages, but the content of the corresponding plaintext is beyond his control (since he doesn't know the key). Depending on the ...


4

The Encrypt then MAC is done in general in order to be sure to decrypt into the correct plaintext, without risking of parsing a non-authentic plaintext message. If you don't MAC the IV, then Mallory (attacker that can tamper with messages as a man-in-the-middle) can modify the IV and your MAC will be still validated as good. So you will decrypt into an ...


3

I know SHAKE128 and 256 are part of the SHA-3 standard but is the SHA3 standard officially released yet? i can only find a draft of the publication, does this mean it's not official and therefor not proven to be secure? No, SHA-3 has not been formally approved. On the other hand, what do you mean "not proved to be secure"? Do you really thing that ...


1

It depends. If you have full control over the whole system, all components and can use whatever algorithm you want to deploy, you can stick to the one giving you the best efficiency which fulfills your security requirements. In this case, it would be Tiger. However, Tiger has a 192 bit output. If that is not enough for you, go for SHA256. However, if the ...


1

It looks fine; whether you use the secret $S_0, S_1$ as the HMAC key, or whether you use the random value $r$ as the HMAC key; if $t' = t$, it implies that either $S_0 = S_1$, or we found a collision in the underlying hash function. I would personally suggest you use $S_0, S_1$ as the key. With HMAC, it doesn't really matter; however if we extend this to ...


1

For any $k$-bit MAC, an attacker blindly guessing a tag has a one-in-$2^k$ chance of successfully forging a message. Thus, the expected number of attempts needed to forge a message by brute force is $2^{256}$ for a 32-byte tag, $2^{128}$ for a 16-byte tag, and $2^{64}$ for an 8-byte tag. In practice, attempting $2^{128}$ forgeries is far beyond the reach ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible