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No, modified algorithms they are unlikely to be harder to break, unless the changes were explicitly made by a cryptographer to make the algorithm more secure. They are certainly not any safer just because they are different. Due to the Kerckhoff principle you should assume that the algorithm is known. So changes in the algorithm in itself does not increase ...


2

The following potential reasons occur to me why someone might not choose to use the CRT optimization: The implementor worries about induced faults (but not quite enough to implement the obvious protection against it). That is, with the CRT optimization, we process the RSA block both mod p and mod q separately, and then combine them. That means that if ...


2

Seems to be opinion-based, since there´s a lack of special point (which modification do you want to make?). But similar questions, that asked for specific modifications, get the same answer: in general, by modifying something without knowing specifically what you´re doing, you´ll be making it worst. Crypto algorithms are designed with specific things in ...


1

Despite what I'm writing in the next three paragraphs, you should stick to the advice given by owlstead's answer and never make any even small change to a crypto algorithm (like changing the order of steps), even if you are a competent cryptographer (if you are, you probably wouldn't consider modifications except for very good reasons worth a publication). ...


1

Public-key cryptography is not sufficiently computationally burdensome to where other approaches must be used for authentication protocols. Note though that what you describe is not actually public-key based. The verification of the MAC requires Dave and Bob to both have a shared key. Also, note that a random component must be included in some manner in all ...


1

It is generally applied as far as I know. One thing that makes it tricky to implement in some situations is that it may be more vulnerable to certain side channel and fault injection attacks than "straight" RSA. Those attacks may expose the prime factors and thus the private key. I cannot see other reasons why it wouldn't be implementable on some platforms, ...



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