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@dave_thompson_085 According to this link https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/dsnotes/2015/12/03/authenticated-encryption-capi2-does-not-support-authenticated-encryption-mode/ Crypto API’s or CAPI2 does not support authenticated encryption mode. This means there are no API’s in CAPI2 that can be used to implement authenticated encryption. It can only be done ...


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rfc5246 7.4.9 defines verify_data as PRF(master_secret, finished_label, Hash(handshake_messages)) [0..verify_data_length-1]; Note the second line; this effectively truncates the PRF output to verify_data_length octets. It goes on to say that verify_data size depends on the cipher suite. Any cipher suite which does not ...


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As you point out, there is the DHGV 2010 scheme over the integers based on the approximate GCD problem but asymptotics are not great with this scheme, for eg. one of the parameters for DHGV is around $2^{\mathcal{O}(\theta^{5})}$ where $\theta$ is the security parameter. Of the so called second generation schemes, I would say that BGV has been pretty well ...


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The homomorphic encryption over the integers variants are much simpler to understand. The idea is that your key is a random odd integer. to encrypt a bit, you add it (0 or 1) to the key multiplied by some integer (to hide the key better) and then add in a random even number to hide the key and value better. To decrypt a bit, you mod by the key, then mod by ...


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There is no difference. The wiki page you referred to contains examples of hashes for all three versions of Whirlpool. For string "The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog", the current version should produce the following hash: B97DE512E91E3828B40D2B0FDCE9CEB3C4A71F9BEA8D88E75C4FA854DF36725F ...


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Ok. I think I will attempt answering this myself. Given that (at least on linux), perl, openssl have gone down the same path as the rhash author (I am not sure who in fact, implemented this first), the reason for a different digest, is that, due to restricting the input message from $2^{512}$ bits to $2^{64}$ bits max, the first $512$ rows of $4 \times ...


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Does such an entity exist? No, not really. There isn't any organizations who's in the business of doing public cryptanalysis, and there certainly aren't any organizations that are sufficiently trusted for the cryptographical community to say "we know algorithm X is secure - organization Y said so". Let's go through the likely suspects: NSA (and ...



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