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9

I'll assumme All ciphered blocks means the same as ciphertext for CBC-Encryption with implicit zero IV, while CBC-MAC is the last block of that. All ciphered blocks is unsafe as a message authenticator for messages longer than one block, for it succumbs to a trivial attack (here with two blocks): Eve intercepts message $M=M_0||M_1$ and its authenticator ...


5

Don't believe every claim ever made in any paper ever written, particularly when the paper provides little or no justification for the claim; not everything you read reflects the cryptographic consensus. This is particularly true for a paper written in 2002, which is a time our understanding of authenticated encryption and security engineering was still in ...


3

Does it negatively affect security to calculate a hash value of the ciphertext before MAC calculation? Like exchanging step 2. with this: HMAC-SHA256(SHA256(ciphertext)). Technically, yes, but not significantly. In order to attack the scheme you propose, the attacker would have to be able to do at least one of two things: (1) Find an attack on the ...


3

If the receiver can wait for all the packets before decrypting: This case is simple, since your final goal is to ensure that the plaintext you decrypt was the exact same plaintext you encrypted. (Trivially, this includes rejecting re-ordered plaintext.) Use an Authenticated Encryption (AE) scheme (eg, CCM, GCM, etc) across all the packets, treating the ...


2

From my point of view, multi-hashing will slow down things, but it won't add the security you are looking for in this case. Is cryptography able to solve this problem? Yes. What you need is a message authentication code (MAC), which is a short piece of information used to authenticate a message and to provide integrity and authenticity assurances on ...


2

1. To clarify: The critical time period here is one year (after wich the certs are changed). With the cracked RSA key the attacker can decrypt the traffic and do nan-in-the-middle attacks, posing as a valid hardware device. Let us take the numbers determined by experts. In their paper on cracking the 768-bit RSA key the researchers state that they needed ...


2

There aren't any known attacks on the PRFness of HMAC-SHA256 better than brute force. (So you can truncate that MAC to length L where $\:\:\frac1{2^L}+\epsilon\:\:$ is an acceptable risk of forgery.) To reduce the impact of a forgery without making the ciphertext any longer, one should use a format-preserving encryption (FPE) scheme that is secure against ...


1

If you want to be sure the value is not altered in transit by an active attacker that is occupying the wire then what you need is an integrity mechanism that will guarantee that nobody has tampered with the message. Such mechanisms are instantiated with the employment of a message authenticated code (MAC) which are build on top of secure crypto primitives ...


1

You can use the well established TLS (Transport Layer Security) protocol to achieve the first three properties and modify it to include a digital signature for non-repudiation*. However, strictly speaking, non-repudiation requires the use of certificates from a CA so that the signature can be verified by any third party.


1

The verifier and logger start with a seed for a forward-secure pseudo-random number generator. To denote a valid ending of a log, append the string of the next $b$ bits of the PRNG's output to the end of the log. $\;\;$ To add a log entry, get the next $\:b\hspace{-0.03 in}+\hspace{-0.03 in}k\:$ bits of the PRNG's output, use the last $k$ of those bits to ...


1

You asked the same question over on the IT Security site. Please don't cross-post. It is frowned upon, under the rules these sites operate. Here is what you should be doing: Truncate the MAC tag to an acceptable length. You will need to choose a length that provides a suitable tradeoff between packet size vs. security against forgery. I suggest you use ...



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