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It looks like, given your adversary model, things should be secure. HMAC as a randomness extractor has been shown to be good, especially when we can assume the hash function is collision resistant. That paper also has some results which tell how you could guard against the collision resistance being broken (basically use a hash function with larger output ...


3

When you use a PRF to derive a key, there is the potential for collisions. If you derived a 128-bit key from each possible 128-bit number, you'd expect some of them to collide. Specifically, you'd expect only about 63% of all the inputs ($1-e^{-1}$) to appear as outputs. That means you lose less than a bit of entropy even if the original key had the full ...


3

A key derivation function lets you derive keys from others. In this case I would use HKDF, which means using HMAC in a predefined way. Your key material is the keys $X$ and $Y$, so you can concatenate those to get the PRK for HKDF-Expand. An output key would then be $\operatorname{HMAC}(X||Y, \text{info} || \text{0x01})$, if the size of the HMAC is long ...


2

The once part inside of the nonce in CTR mode means effectively "once for this particular key". If you use a fresh key for each message (e.g. by encrypting it using public-key crypto or similar), you can use the same nonce for all the messages (or a size-zero nonce). The important part is that the combination of nonce and ctr-value (i.e. what is input into ...


2

It seems that you are trying to implement your own KBKDF (Key Based Key Derivation Function) using HMAC. Maybe it is better to use a pre-defined one. It would be more sensible maybe to use an HSM that is FIPS certified for NIST SP 800-108. These use one of the KBKDFs defined in NIST SP 800-108. You can still use the idea of the random by putting it in the ...


1

HMAC is considered the most secure way of combining two keys, as compared to a single round of SHA256. hmac is designed to fold in the key material in 2 hash operations, which helps resist chosen plaintext attacks on sha-256, although SHA256 has no known chosen plaintext attacks at this time. Symmetric ciphers are considered less reliable than hashes for ...



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