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1. It is "possible for authenticated key exchange without signing/signature scheme". Any means of authenticating messages can replace the signature scheme. 2. If the "pre-shared secret" is a key, then the technique is using MACs to authenticate the messages. $\:$ If the "pre-shared secret" is a passphrase, then the technique is using PAKE to get a shared ...


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Simple solution (with symmetric encryption): Assign each device an ID (probably already present) Store a master key on the server Use a KDF on the master key and the device ID to generate the key for the device. Then you only need the device ID on the device, and the server can re-create that key as required with the master key and the device ID. Of course ...


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Well PBKDF is for deriving keys from passwords, you don't need it if your master keys are already safe, just use something like HKDF. (faster) ECDH and DH are certainly the most secure options you have for negotiating session keys. Of course, as you do have a pre-shared master secret you have some interesting new options. Your usage of the HMAC sounds ...


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PBKDF2 is an acronym for Password Based Key Derivation Function, #2. As you already have a key you need a Key Based Key Derivation Function or KBKDF instead. Currently the most up to date one is probably HKDF, which was - very quickly - also recognized by NIST. There are other KDF's such as KDF1 and KDF2 which are easier to construct (not many libraries ...


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The usage of the r key forces both parties to "fix" the public DH keys. So Alice doesn't know Bob's public DH key before she's generating her own one. And Bob can not make the choice of the public key dependant on Alice's choice and vice versa. This forces both parties to be honest and to generate both public keys at random as there is no opportunity to ...


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Key stretching usually means using a Password-Based Key Derivation Function (PBKDF), these are designed to be more resource intense than standard hashing, which is designed to be as fast as possible. A salt is used to prevent that two derived keys are differentely so that you'd need to brute-force each password independentely. Usually you derive a key from ...



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