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Key length is the length of the key. It's a term whose meaning has evolved over time; these days, it typically means length in bits. With digital symmetric ciphers, it's fairly simple, because those tend to have a key that's just a string of some number of bits, and any string of that length is a valid key. With RSA, it's more complicated - the key has a ...


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Roughly your password is used to encrypt a MasterSecretKey. Then you use this MasterSecretKey with a symmetric algorithm to encrypt or decrypt your data (the disk sectors). They eight key slots in LUKS are eight different encryptions of the same MasterSecretKey under eight different passwords. See also this image: ...


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summmary In general, no. An attacker who has lots of ciphertext+plaintext pairs may never be able to reverse-engineer an algorithm from them. An attack may not even be able to distinguish which one of a large group of known encryption algorithms was used to generate those ciphertexts. However, various weaknesses in some algorithms and protocols are known. ...



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