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Examining his claims about "Thundercloud": You can use it with "any existing software, operating system, or device" (a massive amount of effort---by whom?) Has its "own cryptographic language that is completely independent of any existing security technology" (this is a negative thing: abandoning the entire knowledge base of cryptography is incredibly ...


2

There are many types of weak keys, some of them make it vulnerable to chosen plaintext attack, some of them may leak some statistical properties through the plaintext, some keys generate same subkeys for multiple rounds of an algorithm etc. See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Weak_key . Keys are usualy generated randomly. The randomness is tightly connected ...


2

What you're looking for is called a key derivation function, and more specifically a key stretching function. A key derivation function takes some variable-size material and turns it into a fixed-size key in a deterministic way, such that calling the same function on the same input yields the same key, and the original material cannot be reconstructed from ...


1

Yes, he is full of crap. If you go to KeyLength, you can compare key lengths for different cryptosystems and see how long they're expected to be secure for. It's just a performance vs security tradeoff that implementers make. Most people don't see the point in schlepping around megabytes of key material for cryptosystems that are expected to be secure ...


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For the symmetric key, you can approach this problem as a complete graph with order 1000. With the vertexes representing people and the edges representing the symmetric keys. Then each vertex would have degree 999 and, applying the Handshaking lemma, the number of edges would be: (1000 * 999)/2 = 499500 So they would need 499500 symmetric keys to have a ...



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