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11

The paper Enabling Standardized Cryptography on Ultra-Constrained 4-bit Microcontrollers (page 255) describes such an implementation.


9

In summary: the premise "there is so little space in the bootloader that no cryptographically secure decryption algorithm can be implemented there" is likely wrong; thus security-by-obscurity is not the way to go. The method described in the question attempts to "prevent theft from the publicly released update"; but it fails to do that if an adversary ...


8

Bitslicing is a technique where a computation is Reduced to elementary operations (called gates) with two bit inputs (typically NOR, XOR, and similar like OR AND NAND NXOR), rather than operations on words or integers spanning several bits. Executed in parallel, with as many simultaneous instances (on a single CPU) as there are bits in some register kind, ...


8

Yes, AES could be implemented on a 4-bit micro-controller such as this EM6626, and that would not be rocket science or stupidly slow. This application note illustrates that all kind of 8-bit operations are simple, and table lookups are possible. In fact, tables are not even indispensable if performance is non-critical; see this minimalist AES source code in ...


7

Thought I'd begin with some references for you that might be of interest. These terms are used as key 'selling points' for a number of schemes, including many of the CAESAR submissions. Some examples using the terms specifically are given below - most of which are from CAESER because I have the zoo in-front of me: "Online": OCB, Ascon, CBA, APE, NORX ...


7

For your application: "I need the (underpowered 8-bit) slave to be able to tell if a command issued is really trustable", RSA signature with low public exponent ($e=3$), or Rabin (an analog with $e=2$), is likely the most appropriate, assuming you can't trust the slaves to keep a key secret, which is the only realistic assumption unless that slave uses ...


5

The basic idea of bitslicing, or SIMD within a register, involves two parts: expressing the cipher in terms of single-bit logical operations (AND, OR, XOR, NOT, etc.), as if you were implementing it in hardware, and carrying out those operations for multiple instances of the cipher in parallel, using bitwise operations on a CPU. That is, in a bitsliced ...


5

Bitslicing is a technique that allows multiple instructions/Data points to be encoded into a single register. The idea is that you encode several bitwise operations within a single register. So, instead of 32 bitwise OR operations in sequence, you could reduce the total number of operations by cramming the data into SIMD registers and executing in ...


3

When an embedded device needs asymmetric crypto to encrypt, (e.g. measurements it makes) or check authenticity (e.g. of commands or firmware updates it receives), there is no need for a private key or key generation in the device, and nothing beats RSA and Rabin on simplicity and speed (for RSA: with $e=3$, which is safe when used with proper padding); plus ...


2

Have you considered using symmetric key crypto (MAC) instead ? Elliptic Curve Crypto or even regular (but costly) modular arithmetic might be overkill in your case. As I understand it you would be able to precharge MAC keys into your master and slaves before deployment and you would be set. You can even generate a different key for each so that the ...


2

Salsa/ChaCha and the other eSTREAM winners are likely to be the "fastest but still secure" options today. Don't forget authentication of course. Reduced-round ChaCha/Poly1305 is likely to be the fastest software-only option, due to tuned implementations in the libsodium and NaCl libraries. UPDATED: The following slide deck has good info on state of the art ...


1

Yes, the problem of multicast one-way authentication can be solved using symmetric cryptography only, assuming (at least) one of the following applies (there might be other ways): we trust each receiving party to hold a common secret key secret, and not to use it nefariously; we accept overhead in the broadcasted message growing linearly with the number ...


1

The Problem with NTRU is that it is still patented and rather complex compared to other Cryptoschemes. There are some reference implementations and they are usable with a GPL license. Though I would agree with the comments on your question. You should really have a look into Elliptic Curve Cryptography. Cryptosystems with ECC are usually efficient in space ...


1

Generally it is not advisable to create your own cryptographic operations on a smart card. When programming a smart card you need to understand the risks of side-channel attacks and perturbation attacks. For instance, you may need to program your way around DPA (Differential Power Analysis) and LFI attacks (Laser Fault Injection). Normally you program on ...


1

Someone answered it in another "exchange" site: http://electronics.stackexchange.com/questions/1830/md5-implementation-for-microcontroller There you have links to C implementations, etc. And yes, it's possible to implement MD5 and SHA1 in 8bits, you'll just have to worki with 16 (or 32) bits operations, not that hard...



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