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What is this method/algorithm/construction called? Dunno; this is a new one on me. Is it as secure as CBC implemented the normal way? Should be. Modeled as an abstract 'take plaintext, output ciphertext' model, this method (with a random last ciphertext bits) has precisely the same ciphertext output distribution as CBC mode (with a random IV), ...


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Your mode is essentially equivalent to CFB mode, except that: you've reversed the order of the blocks in the message, and you're using the block cipher in the opposite direction than usual. Neither of those differences should have any direct security implications (since all standard block ciphers have the same security properties in both directions), ...


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I've been thinking a little bit about it, and now I think it is possible, but you have to consider the generalization of CFB in ISO 10116 (I don't have access to the ISO 10116 standard, so I will assume that the description by Rogaway is correct). The generalization of CFB from the ISO standard seems to have two main changes: The feedback block (FB), of ...


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I think it is now valid to answer this question as this course is likely to be over. First observer how CTR-mode works: $C_1=E_K(IV)\oplus P_1$ As you can see, there's a linear relation between the plaintext and the ciphertext. You now use $C_1$ (observed) and $P_1$ (known). You want to make $C'_1$ decrypt to $P_1'$. To obtain this you first construct ...


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A predictable nonce that cannot be controlled by the adversary is safe as a CFB IV (with some assumptions), as shown in the other answers. However, a nonce that can be chosen by an adversary is not safe against chosen plaintext attacks, as shown in Evaluation of Some Blockcipher Modes of Operation (page 36): Assume s = n. The adversary asks its oracle to ...



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