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$GF(2^{128})$ is a finite field with $2^n$ elements. There are a number of ways to represent this field. For example, a binary vector of length 128, or polynomials of degree 127 where the coefficients are 0 or 1. You could even choose to represent them as integers between $0$ and $2^{128}-1$. These are the elements of the finite field. In addition to the ...


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The reference for this is NIST SP800-38A, especially its appendix B. Basically we consider the IV a binary value of the width of the block cipher (64-bit for DES, 128-bit for AES), and add 1 to that, except for one detail: there is no carry at some application-specified rank, defining the maximum number of blocks that can be enciphered with a single IV; if ...


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In CTR, you can use any operation which has a full cycle through the space of the IV with the counter. You could use the plus operator like the example: $69dda8455c7dd4254bf353b773304eec + 1 = 69dda8455c7dd4254bf353b773304eed$ To calculate the next value, just again add 1. You could also use a increasing counter and xor it with the original IV: ...


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In the padding oracle attack you have an oracle that only tells you whether a particular chosen ciphertext decrypts to a correctly padded plaintext. That oracle is used to build a last word oracle, which used iteratively can reveal a whole message. The reason it works in CBC mode is that we can make predictable, arbitrary changes to the plaintext of the ...


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…are any other modes of operation vulnerable to padding oracle attacks? Nope, it’s purely restricted to CBC. A padding oracle attack, also known as “Vaudenay attack” because it was originally published by Serge Vaudenay in 2002 and introduced at EUROCRYPT 2002, is an attack against cipher-block chaining. The attack works against any block cipher in ...



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