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13

I'd say that the whole argument hinges around a "secret attack" that possibly the NSA may know of, enabling them to break some instances of elliptic curves that the rest of the World considers as safe, because the secret attack is, well, secret. This yields to the only possible answer to your question: since secret attacks are secret, they are not known to ...


7

I would characterize the service as similar to a trusted time-stamping service. Except they do not do the time-stamping, but just provide the "key". This allows a user to decide what do to with it, such as using it as a private key to sign something, or an HMAC key, proving the signature is "not older" than the timestamp. If the signature is published to a ...


6

This has been basically asked already: Should we trust the NIST recommended ECC parameters? History Once it was found that NSA allegedly had inserted backdoor to a cryptographic standard, people started thinking what standard it was. The most common guess is that the Dual EC DRBG is the backdoored standard. However, some amount of (possibly justified) ...


6

Plenty of ciphers come out of the USA from government research or selection competitions. AES and DES are examples. Indeed, the US is known from some crypto-related competitions that were/are ope to anyone and they surely will do ample of government research related to cyptology, but you need to be sure that you differ between “they selected it” and ...


5

No they did not, the internals and security levels have not been changed from the draft Keccak submission, only the padding rule has changed. The padding change is the only difference, this allows future tree hashing modes as well as the current SHAKE outputs to generate different digests given the same security parameters and message inputs. Up to 4 ...


4

You are using the wrong value as the modulus; you ought to be using the value $r$ (which is also listed in the document). $p$ is the characteristic of the field that the elliptic curve you're using is defined on. In this case, we're not interested in that; instead what we're interested in is the order of the curve, that is, that value $r$ such that $rP = ...


3

The routine you link to is already performing that check (lines 15-17): it returns $(0,0,0)$ when $S$ and $T$ are equal, and the caller is expected to handle this by calling the doubling routine. The equality verification is performed by checking whether $$X_1Z_2^2 - X_2Z_1^2 = 0$$ $$Y_1Z_2^3 - Y_2Z_1^3 = 0$$ It is easy to see that, since $x = X/Z^2$ ...


3

PRNGs are a difficult and hot topic. Some tests can be found here: What tests can I do to ensure my PRNG is working correctly? But they do not tell you (or others) if your PRNG is really secure. A PRNG must be build in a way, that a third party is not able to "calculate" former or upcoming PRNG output based on some random data from the PRNG.


3

I wonder why anyone would choose to rely on a source of true random numbers fraught with questions that will ultimately have no provable - or perhaps even satisfactory - answer. There are at least a couple of companies that sell generators that provide high quality true random numbers. Having a generator on-site and available real-time allows the necessary ...


3

NIST SP800-131A (Recommendation for Transitioning the Use of Cryptographic Algorithms and Key Lengths, 2011) §4 specifies that the RNGs from ANSI X9.31 are disallowed after 2015, but as fgrieu notes this is a 3DES-based algorithm; the NIST specification does not explicitly mention the commonly-used AES variant. NIST does however recommend (but not mandate) ...


3

X9.31-based PRNGs as used in current practice (including in the Botan library) tend to be extensions of the generator of ANSI X9.31-1998 appendix A.2.4 (which designated purpose is as a submodule of a prime generator for RSA keys). This really is the PRNG of ANSI X9.17-1985 Appendix C (which designated purpose is generating DES keys), also described in ...


3

Actually, s is in CFB mode to handle transmission channels for the encrypted data that can add or drop individual bytes. In the olden times (say, the 70's), it was common to transmit data over serial channels, for example, RS-232. These channels were not perfect, and one common error we see is that if the transmitter sent 7 bytes, the receiver might get ...


2

I don't consider the following a complete answer, but it is a start, and best I can do with my very limited knowledge. I hope someone could fix it or improve it. These type of attacks are only possible against specific implementation of higher level protocols. I will start by describing an invalid-curve attack against a specific ECDH based protocol. ...


2

Your output already includes the relevant interpretation guidelines: The minimum pass rate for each statistical test with the exception of the random excursion (variant) test is approximately = 96 for a sample size = 100 binary sequences. The minimum pass rate for the random excursion (variant) test is approximately = 67 for a sample size = 71 binary ...


2

The sect curves are curves over a binary field. From SEC 2: Recommended Elliptic Curve Domain Parameters (chapter 3): The example elliptic curve domain parameters over $\mathbb{F}_{2^m}$ have been given nicknames to enable them to be easily identified. The nicknames were chosen as follows. Each name begins with sec to denote ‘Standards for Efficient ...


2

Background When defining protocol compliant with NIST SP 800-108, you just need to pick suitable options, which work well with your protocol. If there is a need to be compatible with a specific pre-existing protocol, you may want to take a look at NIST SP 800-135Rev1, which defines application specific key derivation functions. It is notable to recognize ...


1

First up: Don't believe the hype! Especially if things can easily be proven wrong. What I mean is that your NIST have just launched a new service… is incorrect, as the NIST Randomness Beacon project is known to me (and others) since 2011. Furthermore, this project was awarded a multi-year grant from NIST's Innovations in Measurement Science (IMS) Program in ...



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