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5

Yes. The easiest way is if $K$ is an RSA private key, and Bob has the public key. Then, here's how it works; we'll call the ciphertext that Bob has $C$: Bob selects a random number $r$, and computes both $C \cdot r^e \bmod N$ and $r^{-1} \bmod N$ (where $e$ and $N$ are the public exponent and the modulus from the public key) Bob sends $C \cdot r^e \bmod ...


5

What you are seeking for is a special case of secure multiparty computation, namely secure function evaluation or also called secure 2 party computation. However, general solutions to this problem require interaction, meaning that the parties performing the computation need to exchange more than two messages. You write: To compute some arbitrary ...


3

More generally, any encryption that is commutative can be used because then: $$(D_k \circ D_K \circ E_k \circ E_K)(m) = m$$ I.e. Bob can encrypt the ciphertext $E_K(m)$ with a new key $k$, then gives that to Alice for decoding with $K$ and finally decodes it himself with $k$. Stream ciphers are commutative, as is exponentiation modulo $n$ (used in RSA) ...


3

The simplest way to do this would be to have the sender randomly shuffle the elements. The receiver chooses a random element to request. That way the receiver has no idea which of the original (before the shuffle) elements he got.


1

The obvious approach is to help Bob learn $s_0 \oplus (s_0 \oplus s_1) \times c$, presumably using $F$ to help him learn this information. So, here is the natural protocol: Alice and Bob invoke $F$. Alice provides the input $s_0 \oplus s_1$, Bob provides the input $c$. Alice learns $p$ and Bob learns $q$, where we are guaranteed that $p \oplus q = (s_0 ...


1

How about hashes? $P_i$ choose random numbers $R_i$ that they exchange through $S$. They calculate $H_i = H(R_1|R_2|m_i)$ that they give $S$. If $H_1 = H_2$, then $S$ can be reasonably sure $m_1=m_2$. Assuming $H$ is a strong cryptographic hash function and $R_i$ are long enough to avoid collisions (e.g. 256 bits), the worst the server can do is a brute ...



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