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3

There is no difference. The wiki page you referred to contains examples of hashes for all three versions of Whirlpool. For string "The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog", the current version should produce the following hash: B97DE512E91E3828B40D2B0FDCE9CEB3C4A71F9BEA8D88E75C4FA854DF36725F ...


2

You're fine. There are several different padding methods listed in PKCS v1.5. The method that has active attacks is actually a padding used during public key encryption - that is, it's used to encode the plaintext message before handing it off to the RSA public function. We don't use that method to sign messages. For that matter, the attack model used ...


2

No, you do not add the ASN.1 encoding to the hash when generating an ECDSA signature. There are two reasons for this: The first is that there is no room, if we select a curve and a hash with equal security. To be secure against attacks that take $O(2^N)$ time, a curve needs to have a prime that's at least $2N$ bits; to be secure against collision attacks ...


1

A TLS session can be resumed once both sides know of the session. The exchange of the necessary information (i.e. session identifier or session ticket) is done within the initial handshake. This means a session can already be re-used within other connections once this initial handshake is done. How long the session information are kept and if they are ...


1

Ok. I think I will attempt answering this myself. Given that (at least on linux), perl, openssl have gone down the same path as the rhash author (I am not sure who in fact, implemented this first), the reason for a different digest, is that, due to restricting the input message from $2^{512}$ bits to $2^{64}$ bits max, the first $512$ rows of $4 \times ...



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