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5

Any of the ways you listed would work. If you're collecting alternatives, yet another one (which I have seen in practice) is to include the message counter as the AAD (additional authenticated data), which is another input to GCM. When we consider which one would be the best, we note that GCM has absolutely no requirement that the nonce be "random", or for ...


4

Yes, 3DES is a symmetric cipher and you use a secret key for both encryption and decryption with it. However, that is not the same thing as the keys used in RSA or other public key cryptography – you cannot (and should not) use either of them for 3DES. Since you are using S/MIME, you are actually using public key encryption. Any reference to 3DES is about ...


1

For full explanation, see Is there a standard for OpenSSL-interoperable AES encryption? . Short answer: what openssl enc (without -K for raw) uses is not PBKDF2; it is almost PBKDF1, with iteration count 1. This imposes almost no cost on attacker trials, so unless your passwords are strong enough to be keys by themselves you should avoid it if you can. In ...


1

OpenSSL uses EVP_BytesToKey, an algorithm proprietary to OpenSSL, with a salt and an iteration count set to 1. The algorithm isn't that insecure; the iteration count of 1 of course is. There are implementations for other languages/runtimes if you look for it. This page (on nabble.com) explains a bit about accessing PBKDF2 from the command line. It also ...


1

how efficient is OpenSSL? Efficient enough to be "widely deployed and used". What's some efficiency concerns of it? I'm not aware of any particular concerns in this regard. On the other hand, it has to be understood that openSSL supports a wide range of different platforms and it just can't be perfectly optimised for each platform. What kind of ...



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