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In HMAC, the key $K$ [after it has been replaced by $H(K)$ if $K$ was wider than the hash's internal block size] is padded with zeros to the hash's internal block size. The question asks why this padding. In a nutshell: the security argument of HMAC would not hold without that. HMAC's original and improved security arguments make heavy use of the ...


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RSA-OAEP is an encryption scheme that is CCA secure in the random oracle model (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Optimal_asymmetric_encryption_padding). You are talking about encrypting/decrypting hashes with some private/public key, but I don't think you're actually talking about encryption schemes. What you probably mean are digital signature schemes ...


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Though Bob may potentially delay his response by one year or more, the attacker may probably assume that, in practice, Bob will respond rather promptly. Thus, an active attacker can infer from Bob's response, or lack thereof, whether decryption occurred or not. This is a setup where Bleichenbacher's attack seems to apply. However, one must take the fine ...


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The problem is not with compression and encryption, it is with the protocol that is being used, and the type of data being compressed (or not) prior to encryption. The most damning leaks are on protocols that were either designed to be compressed without encryption, or encrypted without compression. The best example I have is VOIP systems that use a ...


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Read about the CRIME and BREACH attacks. They are the classic example where compression before encryption can leak information about the input. The length of the compressed data leaks information about the contents of the data itself. See also http://security.stackexchange.com/q/19911/971 and http://security.stackexchange.com/q/20406/971 and ...



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