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Yes, we always have to pad the message. The reason is simple: How do we know if the message has a padding or not if we don't always pad? Let's say we pad with adding only $0$ bits. We got the (after padding) message $0101\,1100\,0000\,0000$ and a block size of 2 bytes (16 bits). Well, what was the original message? Was it $0101\,11$? Or was it $0101\,1100$? ...


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SSL padding always pads, using 1..blocksize bytes (8 bytes for triple DES, 16 for AES). This padding makes it deterministic independently of the value of the plaintext. It's a padding mode similar to ISO 10126 (only the last padding byte is one less). Other padding values - such as the zero padding performed by PHP's mcrypt library - are also ...


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Yes, your padding and the idea about the length field are correct. Now you just have to append the size of the message as 64-bit big-endian integer (128 bit). After that your enhanced message should be divisible by 1024. Source: Pseudocode of SHA-256 of the English Wikipedia. (Notice the additional information about SHA-512.)


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It would really help to see the encryption and decryption code, as used by your program. The Handling of the IV does not seem right. The IV has the size of the block of the cipher used in conjunction with CBC. Thus it should probably be 16 bytes in length. Additionally you have to use the RAW bytes for CBC and not its Base64 representation. In order to ...



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