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1

The speed of a cipher actually depends on lots of factors, including: The specific hardware platform you're considering (CPU architecture, instruction set, number of cores etc). Implementation details. Compiler flags used. Some ciphers have a large initial overhead due e.g. to a slow key setup; as a result they are slow when encoding very small messages. ...


7

Is Rijndael the fastest block cipher in the world? No. On an Intel 64 Sandy Bridge without AES-NI, AES (a subset of Rijndael) is outperfomed by ChaCha20 (and also likely by Threefish 512 which has about 6-7cpb cost on an older Intel Core 2 Duo with 64-bit ASM (link: original Skein paper PDF)) as opposed to AES' 11 cpb. (7.59 cpb on an Intel Core 2) ...


9

The fastest block cipher is identity, which leaves input blocks completely unchanged. This is infinitely fast on all platforms; however, it is not secure. So maybe you want the fastest block cipher that still offers some given non-trivial level of security? Then it depends a lot on what you want to implement the block cipher on. With recent PC, you would ...


8

It depends how the “AES-128 encryption hardware units” you mention are actually defined. I've already encountered processors that allow to independently compute AES operations such as $\texttt{SubBytes}$ and $\texttt{MixColumns}$ – which are the same regardless the key size involved (128 or 256 bits). In that case: yes, it can speed up the calculation for ...


16

There are two important differences between AES-128 and AES-256: AES-128 has 10 rounds, AES-256 has 14 The key expansion process (that is, how they generate subkeys) is different If your AES-128 encryption hardware just takes a plaintext block and a 128 bit key, and produces a ciphertext block, well, no, there's not much you can do. In this case, the ...



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