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1

GPG is an implementation of OpenPGP, which is a higher level protocol than e.g. mcrypt. So use GPG for PGP compatibility and mcrypt or related libraries for more direct - lower level - access to algorithms. AES is Rijndael for a block size of 128 bits and the 128, 192 or 256 bit key sizes. So you are OK there. Learn about modes of operation and something ...


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To be sure that the message is from A, A has to encrypt it with his private key. Anyone can decrypt it using A's public key. To be sure that the message is for B, A has to encrypt it with B's public key. Only B can decrypt it using his private key. If you use both methods combined, you can be sure that the message is from A and for B. But this does still ...


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If Bob does NOT care to check signatures (as in the question), Eve can send ANY message she wants to Bob pretending to be Alice, including but not limited to messages Eve got from Alice; all Eve needs is Bob's public key (which, as the name implies, is assumed public knowledge thus known to Eve) and straight use of PGP. Therefore the right question is: Can ...


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OpenPGP as defined by RFC 4880 knows two different encodings. Binary encoding Obviously, there is no reasonable limitation to an (ASCII) character subset in binary encoding. Radix 64 Radix 64 is also often entitled ASCII armored. In the end, it is a base64 encoding with a checksum. The content may consist of [a-zA-Y0-0+/=]. ASCII-armored OpenPGP ...


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Yes, it's still talking about the case where multiple hashes are needed to get to the key size. It explains that they are taken independently (different contexts) over the passphrase (the data). For example, with a 160-bit hash (e.g. SHA-1) and a 256-bit key, you would concatenate $H(p)||H(0x00||p)$, then take the leftmost 256 bits (i.e. discard the ...



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