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6

Unfortunately, the answer to your question is yes. You have made glaring mistakes. In particular, Yao's garbled circuits are suited for two-party computation only, and here you wish to carry out a multiparty computation. One huge problem that arises with your entire approach is that if the server colludes with one of the voters, then they can learn the ...


4

TL;DR: Find the most important specification that is of the same type as the one you want to write and use its style for yourself, chances are, other people also have read it. There is a myriad of ways to specify a crypto protocol / design. However, there are four things that you really should take into consideration when writing a crypto-related ...


3

Approach 1 The simplest way of doing this is for the receiver, with choice $j \in \{1,\dots,n\}$, to input $1$ in the $j$-th 1-out-of-2 OT and $0$ elsewhere. The sender, with input $(x_1, \dots, x_n)$, inputs $(0,x_i)$ in the $i$-th OT. Approach 2 An alternative protocol (that just came out of a discussion with a colleague, and seems to be actively ...


2

Sure they can, it's called the socialist millionaires problem. The most common solution is to use Yao's protocol: Alice sends a garbled circuit of the equality function to Bob, and then Alice use oblivious transfers to send the keys necessary for the evaluation of the circuit to Bob. Another option is to rely on additively homomorphic IND-CPA encryption: ...



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