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Not a real solution yet, sill: "linear time", I guess, means linear in number of strings. This is a reasonable efficiency expectation in case of relatively large number of short strings. There could be a solution, I guess, by deciding on incremental prefix or suffix of all candidate strings until the single match. This might grow into new research in private ...


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Approach 1 The simplest way of doing this is for the receiver, with choice $j \in \{1,\dots,n\}$, to input $1$ in the $j$-th 1-out-of-2 OT and $0$ elsewhere. The sender, with input $(x_1, \dots, x_n)$, inputs $(0,x_i)$ in the $i$-th OT. Approach 2 An alternative protocol (that just came out of a discussion with a colleague, and seems to be actively ...


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Tung Chou and Claudio Orlandi created the most efficient 1-out-of-n OT protocol to date, based on an 1-out-of-2 OT protocoln, named The Simplest Protocol for Oblivious Transfer. You can read more about it here.


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Sure they can, it's called the socialist millionaires problem. The most common solution is to use Yao's protocol: Alice sends a garbled circuit of the equality function to Bob, and then Alice use oblivious transfers to send the keys necessary for the evaluation of the circuit to Bob. Another option is to rely on additively homomorphic IND-CPA encryption: ...


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If there is a logger malware in the computer, not a keylogger, the cascading cipher should be weakened, because the application will know the specific way the cipher encrypted something. Reverse mathematic operations maybe discover the password. Cascading ciphers are secure, and have chances that not even a Quantum computer will break it. Here i only say ...



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