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It is equivalent to the computational Diffie-Hellman problem; if you can one of the two problems, you can solve the other (with a polynomial number of queries to the oracle which solves the other). If you can solve the Diffie-Hellman problem, you can solve your problem: this can be seen by first noting that, with a Diffie-Hellman solver, given $g^b$, you ...


6

A fast 64-bit hash cannot be completely secure, since a $2^{32}$ brute force collision search is completely doable, and even a $2^{64}$ preimage attack could be feasible. As a MAC used for hash table keying, that doesn't really matter (unless you leak the key). Finding just a few collisions isn't a problem and gathering statistics for an attack would ...


3

This may just be a matter of terminology. A claim that an algorithm is "secure" is meaningless without qualifying/quantifying what it is secure against. Conventionally, the security/strength of cryptographic primitives is described and analysed in terms of computational and memory cost (i.e. secure against an attacker capable of performing a certain number ...


3

HMAC-SHA-256 is sufficient for up to 256 bit security. Confer e.g. NIST SP 800-107. This recommendation is based on the premise that collision attacks are infeasible against common uses of HMAC, and that you consequently only have to worry about primary pre-image attacks that attempt to recover the secret key (and use this for forging subsequent messages). ...



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