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Security analysis of "Nix /dev/random" is discussed here "Security Analysis of Pseudo-Random Number Generators with Input: /dev/random is not Robust", by Yevgeniy Dodis, David Pointcheval, Sylvain Ruhault, Damien Vergnaud, and Daniel Wichs. http://eprint.iacr.org/2013/338.pdf With an interesting blog ...


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Yes, the Pseudo Random Number Generator (PRNG) in OpenSSL is Cryptographically Secure, which means it passes statistical tests, but as @Maarten Bodewes suggests in his comment, why not go one step further and use that PRNG directly, rather than through OpenSSL? OpenSSL can use EGD (which stands for Entropy Gathering Daemon). It is a process that taps into ...


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Quite a few message authentication codes are actually PRFs with arbitrary input domains. For example: HMAC, instantiated with a hash function satisfying the appropriate security properties (basically, for Merkle–Damg√•rd hash functions like the SHA-2 family, that the internal compression function is itself a PRF), is provably a PRF. CMAC, ...


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A pseudorandom generator is far more specific. A pseudorandom number generator can just be statistical and/or produce an endless stream of output and/or take extra entropy as input while it's running. This RFC gives a way to implement a pseudorandom function. In fact, if you hadn't specified that you wanted a PRG to implement a PRF, then I would've just ...


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A hash function is a stateless "primitive" function: given an input of X, it always produces the same output Y, where Y is a fixed length. A cryptographically secure hash function has some additional requirements: given output Y = hash(X), it is hard to deduce input X; given output Y = hash(X1), it is hard to find output Y = hash(X2); and that it is hard to ...



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