Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

4

If you need security against quantum attacks, there aren't that many options. I would go for a lattice-based encryption like NTRU or something based on ring learning with errors. There are no "magic numbers" involved and the assumptions they are based on have been scrutinized by the academic community. NTRU has been around for a decade and has pretty good ...


2

When you go from Affine to Jacobian, $X$ and $Y$ stay the same, and $Z$ is equal to $1$ Affine -> Jacobian: $(X',Y',Z') = (X,Y,1)$ Jacobian -> Affine: $(X',Y') = (\frac{X}{Z^2}, \frac{Y}{Z^3} )$


2

Supersingular isogenies are a rather recent attempt at post quantum security. You will have a hard time finding an efficient and secure implementation, and even if you write one yourself, the algorithms have not yet seen that much cryptanalysis. (Although that's a subjective judgement call.) If post quantum security wasn't a concern, you could choose from ...


1

Public-key cryptography is not sufficiently computationally burdensome to where other approaches must be used for authentication protocols. Note though that what you describe is not actually public-key based. The verification of the MAC requires Dave and Bob to both have a shared key. Also, note that a random component must be included in some manner in all ...


1

I'll answer the related questions in order: No, because a ciphertext (generated from a key stream generated by a stream cipher) should be indistinguishable from random data, and a MAC should be as well. No, because #1 depends on the secret, and the secret was derived using a Diffie-Hellman key agreement algorithm, using the given curve. To know ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible