Hot answers tagged

6

Yes, the basic idea of hardcoding a public key is secure. It is sometimes recommended as an alternative to the complexity TLS and PKI bring – otherwise it can be easy to skip a crucial step and end up with little or no security. However, the "encrypt a secret for server" scheme has some weaknesses compared to TLS. The clearest is lack of forward secrecy ...


3

For private key operations you need at least $n$ (the modulus) and $d$ (the private exponent). The primes $p$ and $q$ let you calculate those – or use some shortcuts for quicker computation – so they also suffice. In practice RSA keys often include all of those values, to avoid having to compute them as needed and to allow for optimized and unoptimized ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible