Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

10

This depends on the public-key system (algorithm). For RSA, technically the private and public key (i.e. the exponents, the keys share the same modulus) are symmetric, you can swap them, and it still works. But you usually don't want to do this: The public exponent is usually a small number (like $3$ or $2^{16} + 1$) in order to speed up ...


9

Diffie Hellman Diffie Hellman is a key exchange protocol. It is an interactive protocol with the aim that two parties can compute a common secret which can then be used to derive a secret key typically used for some symmetric encryption scheme. I take the notation from the link above and this means we have a group $\mathbb{Z}_p^*$ for prime $p$ ...


8

What is usually meant by "group encryption" is not what you are after. Group encryption algorithms strive to achieve the following: a given message is encrypted, and may be decrypted only if sufficiently many group members collaborate. This is not what you seek; what you want is a system such that a given message can be encrypted once and every member of the ...


8

When encrypting something with RSA, using PKCS#1 v1.5, the data that is to be encrypted is first padded, then the padded value is converted into an integer, and the RSA modular exponentiation (with the public exponent) is applied. Upon decryption, the modular exponentiation (with the private exponent) is applied, and then the padding is removed. The core of ...


7

The two last equations don't directly give you the value of $C_i$, they are telling you the values of the remainder of Ci when divided by $P$ and $Q$. You then use the Chinese Remainder Theorem with this information to produce the value of $C_i$ (modulo $N$) that you are looking for. See en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chinese_remainder_theorem (there is an algorithm ...


7

There are multiple metrics for work or effort needed: Amount of operations it takes (one operations is, for instance, one invocation of hash function or number of modular multiplication operations) Amount of money it takes Amount of memory it takes Amount of time it takes Strength in bits Amount of operations Usually, if amount of operations is large ...


7

ECDSA is a digial signature algorithm ECIES is an Intergrated Encryption scheme ECDH is a key secure key exchange algorithm. First you should understand what are the purpose of these algorithms. Digital signature algorithms are used to authenticate a digital content.A valid digital signature gives a recipient reason to believe that the message was created ...


7

That's because the public key in DER format (which is a way of expressing X.509 objects as a sequence of bytes) includes more than just the modulus. Specifically, it consists of: This is a collection of the following objects; that takes up 4 bytes The first object is an integer (which happens to be the public modulus); the integer itself is 257 bytes (not ...


7

I had a similar problem, and it took me a long time to figure out all the math, as some of the proofs can be rather terse. So, I took it upon myself to write a full explanation of how to factor N, without all the symbols and relying on a bit less prior knowledge. This is an application of the shared modulus attack explained by Boneh in his analysis of RSA ...


7

Selecting a small $d$ is known to be insecure. Wiener has shown in 1990 that if $\log d \leq \frac14 \log N$, the private exponent $d$ can be reconstructed from the public key $(N,e)$. If you're interested in making the private computational cost cheaper, then I would suggest that RSA is not the best solution; I would recommend you start looking at ...


6

If the KGC gets compromised it will break security, so why should a KGC generate private keys. Certificateless crypto tries to overcome the problem which exists in identity based crypto, i.e., that the KCG generates all the private keys of the users (that is necessary in IBE, see below) and thus knows all the private keys of users (which in turn enables ...


6

If CryptoLocker does its job properly, then no, knowing part of the cleartext will not help you recover the rest. If that helped, then the encryption system would be called weak against known-plaintext attacks. From what I read, it seems that the CryptoLocker authors were competent(*), so no such luck. (In particular, the asymmetric encryption with RSA-2048 ...


6

A lot of sleepless nights for the CA, their customers, web browser and OS developers, and Slashdot users, that's what. I don't know if a CA has ever had their private keys compromised, but there have been incidents where their systems were broken into and fraudulent certificates were issued. (There's a difference between a private key actually being taken, ...


6

There is no direct inference from $P = NP$ or $P \neq NP$ to security or insecurity of any particular encryption algorithm. As far as practical consequences are concerned, the "$P = NP$" problem is severely overhyped. If $P = NP$ then any problem for which a solution can be verified in polynomial time can also be solved in polynomial time. "Polynomial time" ...


6

No, signing the hash of the public key cannot introduce a weakness on a secure signature scheme. When we have a signature scheme, we assume that it is secure in an chosen text model, where the attacker has access to the public key, and can ask any text of his choosing to be signed. We can see that any such scheme (such as ECCDSA, or so we believe) cannot ...


6

Rick Demer already wrote the answer in the very first comment, but without explanation: Hybrid encryption. But since you asked for a real practical example to encrypt your word document, this is how: Your file is on your disc, and it is 100,000 byte large. You can then do: First, you start up a random number generator. Preferably you should either have ...


6

Yes, you are correct. The simplest way without stepping outside NaCl would be to have both create an ephemeral, random crypto_box_keypair, then exchange public keys using their long term keys. Further communication would use that new keypair for crypto_box during that session. After they are done with the session, delete those ephemeral keys from memory. ...


6

Think about this: what does it mean that $\gcd(e_B, e_C)=1$. Formally that means there exist some $s_1, s_2$ such that $e_Bs_1 + e_Cs_2=1$. Say you have two ciphertexts (the following math is all done modulo the shared modulus), $C_B=M^{e_B}$ and $C_C=M^{e_C}$. You can do the following: $$\begin{align} ...


6

So your protocol goes like this: Alice generates a key pair $(a_{priv}, a_{pub})$ and sends $a_{pub}$ to Bob. Bob generates a key pair $(b_{priv}, b_{pub})$ and sends $b_{pub}$ to Alice. Alice generates a message $m$ and sends $Enc(Sign(m, a_{priv}), b_{pub})$ (or $Sign(Enc(m, b_{pub}), a_{priv})$, I'm not sure which of both is usually used by PGP) to Bob. ...


6

The only reason you are seeing this is because you are dealing with such small primes. With primes like we would use in practice (1024 bits), the probability of this happening is very, very small. And, it can only happen when $e>\sqrt{\lambda(n)}$. Since we typically use $e=65537$ in practice, it is guaranteed to not happen. Anyways, there is no mistake ...


5

McEliece NTRU Multivariate If you mean "syntactically public key" instead of "implies the existence of secure key agreement", then there is also hash-based signatures.


5

We need clear goals. The question asks for "plausible deniability" or "deniable encryption", and these terms needs a precise definition in a public-key context (implied by RSA). I assume that in addition to the IND-CPA and IND-CCA1 properties of a cipher, including hybrid (as implied by AES), it is desired that: One without the private key can't ...


5

Actually, it's not true that public key encryption is based on Discrete Log; the ones in common use (DH, ECDH, ECDSA) are (and even RSA can be viewed as "based on Discrete Log", at least from the standpoint of "if you can solve the Discrete Log modulo a composite, you can break RSA"). However, we do have a number of public key systems (NTRU, McEliece) which ...


5

For P2P authentication, you can go for web of trust concept. Simply this means, if someone is trusted by people you can trust, you can also trust that unknown person. In OpenPGP, a certificate can be signed by other users who trust the association of that public key with the person or entity listed in the certificate. So trust relationships can be ...


5

Public key crypto vs. identity-based crypto made short: In traditional public key cryptography, a user $A$ generates a private/public key pair $(sk_A,pk_A)$ and since this key pair has absolutely no indication to which indentity (user $A$) it belongs, it is necessary to certify the public key, i.e., bind the public key $pk_A$ to the user $A$'s identity. ...


5

Symmetric encryption is no longer necessary, because all security services can be implemented with public-key cryptography. No. The speed of asymmetric encryption is prohibitive when it comes to encrypting more than a few hundred bits of data. This is why most protocols that implement encryption with asymmetric cryptography are hybrid, using asymmetric ...


5

Yes, we need symmetric cryptosystems, for many reasons; to give three of these: We need a hash function to make most asymmetric cryptosystems secure (e.g. we simply do not have a secure signature system based on RSA without a hash), and current hash functions are (or are built from) symmetric cryptosystems. All asymmetric encryption cryptosystems are bound ...


5

How do we keep $\phi(n)$ secret? We don't tell people what it is. The problem of finding $\phi(n)$ given $n$ is a hard problem (if $n$ is hard to factor). So, if we give people a number that they can't factor, and we don't give them $\phi(n)$, they can't determine it on their own.


5

The paper you link to in your comment is a fictional paper where the author (inspired by experiences with reviews he got for his own papers) imagines how negative reviews to groundbreaking papers could have looked like. So its just fun ;) AFAIK the RSA paper has never been rejected (but the very first paper of Ralph Merkle on public key crypto got rejected, ...


4

That's correct. If this happens, then your PKI is doomed and you have to set it up again and roll out all the certificates again. Actually, then not all the certificates are "compromised" in the sense of key compromise, but you cannot longer trust them, since if someone is in possession of the root private key, this person can issue arbitratrily dated ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible