Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

17

Well, cryptographers have been contemplating a post-quantum world for some time now. Quantum computing, although in its infancy as far as real-life computers go, has been studied in a theoretical sense for a quite a while. Shor's algorithm was published 19 years ago; Grover's, 17 years ago. These are the two most-famous quantum algorithms, I think, but the ...


5

QKD aims at exchanging key material to be used with encryption based on OTPs between two parties and thus to achieve perfect secrecy for transmitted messages. There are, however, several drawbacks for practical use in a wired setting of QKD (required hardware and their vulnerability to hacks, limited distance which does not support end-to-end ...


5

I'm not going to exactly answer your question, because I have no idea. I simply do not know how fast the quantum computer is that NSA is building in secret. However I could explain why people recommend 256-bit security in the face of quantum computing using some numbers. If you feel that $2^{128}$ is a comfortable security against bruteforcing, remember ...


3

In fact, the basic idea of Shor's algorithm for the discrete logarithm problem is reasonably simple. Assume (as in Section 4 Discrete Log: the easy case of Shor's paper) that you have an efficient quantum algorithm for the Fourier transform. Then, applying this Fourier transform twice (once for $a$ and once for $b$) on a quantum superposition of values ...


2

Adding more qubits does not increase the computation speed. A quantum computer with 4 qubits does not factorize faster than one with 2. The qubits are the "memory" of the quantum computer. More qubits mean you can factor bigger numbers. If I remember correctly, you need a superposition of $\Theta(N^2)$ terms, which means $\Theta(\log(N^2))$ qubits to factor ...


2

D-Wave does quantum annealing. It's not general-purpose quantum computing; in fact, the CEO claims that the gate-model for quantum computers is the worst thing that ever happened to the field. I have worked on quantum research as recently as 2012 and the gate-model is still the main focus for funded research. Shor's algorithm for factorization (which runs ...


2

What you are describing is known as the Photon Number Splitting Attack (PNS), described for the first time (I think) by Brassard, L├╝tkenhaus, Mor ans Sanders in this 1999 paper. Several countermeasures have been invented since (single photon sources, robust protocols, decoy states), but detailing them would stray away from of your question. If one sends 2 ...


2

There are several kind of quantum key distribution (QKD) protocols as of today. Are you looking for a particular one? The best known QKD protocol goes by the name BB84 after its inventors Bennett and Brassard and the year in which they presented their work. Searching on the Internet, I found this link http://fredhenle.net/bb84/demo.php with a simulation ...


1

The obvious approach is to help Bob learn $s_0 \oplus (s_0 \oplus s_1) \times c$, presumably using $F$ to help him learn this information. So, here is the natural protocol: Alice and Bob invoke $F$. Alice provides the input $s_0 \oplus s_1$, Bob provides the input $c$. Alice learns $p$ and Bob learns $q$, where we are guaranteed that $p \oplus q = (s_0 ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible