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2

I ran the command under dtruss on OSX, with it pointing to a static file. Even then, it appears to use this as an additional source of randomness to /dev/urandom. It's distasteful and almost certainly pointless. But assuming it only mixes the data into an already cryptographically-secure source of randomness, it's not actively harmful. That said, I can only ...


-7

I personally found there is the only true randomness generated by computers. It' simply data corruption. Everyone hates data corruption because it means nothing to them, and true randomness means nothing as well. I experienced corrupted photo files whose broken pixels obscured the original image randomly. I recommend making data corruption by executing ...


2

Potentially almost any data input can be used as seed. But in general you don't want to use information that can be trusted to have high entropy and be secret all the time. This rules out stock exchange and the weather for instance, as the stock exchange may be down, and there is not much entropy in a clear blue skye. Almost all of the sources you mention ...


3

Formally, what you're really looking for is a key derivation function (KDF). The Crypto++ API includes a PasswordBasedKeyDerivationFunction class, but that doesn't really seem optimal for your purposes; since you already have a high-entropy random seed, what you really want is a simple key-based KDF, not a fancy key-stretching KDF meant for use with ...


1

Apple's RNG is cryptographically secure, provided it has had enough time to gather entropy. The early PRNG, though, was found to have problems in the iPhone as recently as iOS7, according to a researcher from Azimuth Security. I have not heard of any problems regarding the SecRandomCopyBytes() routine for a regular app, and there are lots of eyes on it.


1

Testing properly implemented Fortuna is little different than testing any alleged cryptographically secure random number generator. The fundamental problem is a philosophical one, as well as a practical one. For simulation it may be sufficient to choose digits from pi, which is universally believed to be randomly distributed. But, as a cryptographic key or ...


2

This is not likely to be a good method to generate random numbers -- at least not on its own, without significant additional analysis. You need a source of random numbers that is not only noisy, but also unpredictable to an adversary. It's not clear that radio will meet that need. If you listen on a FM band, an adversary who is nearby can also listen on ...


10

Let me begin by saying that if you have a hardware source of randomness, you don't need to be stingy with it. 1) Does modulo affect the quality of randomness, faking in some way the distribution of values? Yes, it does. Or at any rate, it can --- see my answer to (3) below for more details. (I'm assuming by "quality of randomness", you specifically mean ...



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