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1

If the sequences are supposed to be perfectly random, you may want to take a look at e.g. the NIST statistical test suite. However, you should be aware that statistical tests don't prove or really even estimate entropy. They are just a sanity check that tells you whether the numbers look random. Non cryptographic PRNGs that are completely predictable can ...


2

Some CSPRNGs accept a constant width seed. That means they could only be used as randomness extractors for that input size; no less, no more. For example, AES-128 CTR_DRBG CSPRNG (from 800-90A) would only accept 256 bits of seed for the key and initial vector in total. Further, if the input is not fully random (as you'd expect with a randomness extractor), ...


2

I would say that whitening is a more general concept than randomness extraction. In randomness extraction you have an input with some entropy that isn't perfectly random and an output that should be perfectly random and full entropy. In whitening there is not necessarily an entropy requirement on the output, it just needs to look perfectly random to an ...


7

There is some relationship between the two notions, but a CSPRNG is designed to be computationally secure (secure against adversaries with bounded computation time), whereas a randomness extractor is required to be information-theoretically secure (unconditionally secure against adversaries with unbounded computation time). So, they're different primitives. ...


2

On your earlier questions: 1) How secure is this method for generating one-time pads in block- or stream-ciphers? This method in itself is not secure, as the output weakly random entropy source, not a TRNG; there is entropy in the keystrokes, but without any whitening and extraction taking place, the output is - for instance - not well distributed. The ...



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