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The goal of an ideal cryptographically secure pseudo-random number generator (CSPRNG) is to produce a stream of numbers that no machine can distinguish from a truly random stream of numbers. Formally, it's impossible to give a proof that a CSPRNG is truly random. That being said, there exists a family of statistical tests that can measure whether a sequence ...


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It's probably a bit late, but it's relatively easy to get an estimate of entropy. It doesn't matter if some bits are repetitive or not as it's the bits that aren't that contain entropy. You don't need any weird transformations of the data. You have what is called a bit fixing entropy source. Stick all your integers into a single file (binary or ascii - ...


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Unfortunaltly NO! The factorization is a hard problem on which many cryptosystems or crypto-protocols are build, and is know as the IFP problem to opposite ti DLP (Discret Log Problem) and intractability. Even in the case where $M= 10^{10}$ computers are available, you can't accelerate the resolution of the IFP by M, unless you invent a new an clever ...


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Have you actually tried coding this thing? It's not a PRNG, it's an oscillator. I tried running it with various seed values, and every time it ended up in a loop of about $1000$ iterations. If the initial seed is $(0, 1, 2, 3, 4)$, then the resulting loop has just $560$ iterations. A five-byte seed is also way too small. Even if you do get it running ...


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Use RSA instead? eg: generate an RSA keypair, and discard the private key, then encrypt your starting state. If you want to make it faster, manually input the bigmath instructions needed for encryption, unroll them, then manually optimise: you get the added benefit that the result looks just like a "normal" IV, except if you've kept the secret key, you can ...


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The answer by fgrieu is excellent as always. However, I just wanted to document an alternative approach. If bias is small enough it is practically the same as there was no bias at all. For this reason, some standards like NIST's public key standard FIPS 186-4: Digital Signature Standard allow random number generation, where some extra octets are generated ...


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Try to use bitmasks. For example - M is your desired high limit, so use r ?< M/n as a bit mask constructing your number. And after all XOR it with one extra number from RNG.


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You can use xinput --test to record mouse movement data and then "crunch" the recorded data into a random hash using a hash algorithm like MD5. E.g. xinput --list (shows your mouse device id is 15) and you want to collect 5 seconds of mouse data: $> mouse_data=$(timeout 5 xinput --test 15) If you want to play around with a script that incorporates ...



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