Tag Info

New answers tagged

2

The key space for DES is far too small (56 bits). Therefore, any use of DES is not secure. It doesn't matter what mode you use. If the attacker has one plaintext, ciphertext pair, they can brute force the key space and recover the key in a feasible amount of time (24 hours using the cloud). But most importantly, how it could be made secure? Will change ...


1

It is not at all secure if you fix the key and IV in the code, no matter what language you use. Ideally you should generate the key from a password based key derivative function like PBKDF2 or SCRYPT or provision the key from an external key management server. You also need to chose a encryption mode along with the scheme. The modes are picked based on the ...


4

Like the other answers say, it does not always have to be the case. One other case where it is often not stored is when you have a single use key, for example as part of some hybrid encryption scheme. Then there is no need to use a nonce at all and it is usually taken to have zero value.


11

I restrict to hash functions $H$ with an output of some fixed size $n\ge1$ bit(s), accepting as input some strings, including all $n$-bit strings; MD5 (resp. SHA-1, SHA-256) is an example of such function for $n=128$ (resp. $n=160$, $n=256$). Whether there exists a solution to $H(x)=x$ depends on the particular hash function. If $H$ is a random function (as ...


5

If you want strict indistinguishability, then yes, you need to store the IV (initial counter) somewhere. However, there are some relaxed modes that are used in practice for things like disk encryption, where it is often very useful to decrypt things "in the middle" like you say. For instance, XEX uses a counter which is derived from the sector and offset ...


7

I would like to ask if that is true for every AES CTR mode implementation?, Doesn't have to be. You can store the nonce anywhere. You could even send it to the recipient via a different channel (e.g., email the ciphertext and use SMS to transmit the nonce). Storing it at the beginning has its advantages. For example, if streaming the data, you can ...


3

The correction question you should ask about why various operations in RC4 (or, for that matter, any other cipher) are there would be "if I were to remove that, what would the impact be? Would this weaken the cipher in some way?" At your current state of knowledge, that may be a rather imponderable question, but it is still the correct one. I can try to ...


1

The sect curves are curves over a binary field. From SEC 2: Recommended Elliptic Curve Domain Parameters (chapter 3): The example elliptic curve domain parameters over $\mathbb{F}_{2^m}$ have been given nicknames to enable them to be easily identified. The nicknames were chosen as follows. Each name begins with sec to denote ‘Standards for Efficient ...



Top 50 recent answers are included