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1

Salts are generally stored in the database with the password. They shouldn't be timestamps, salts should be random values of 128 bits or more (though this may vary depending on the hashing scheme used.) Salts improve security by making brute force attempts single-use: a password of "password" is likely going to be used many, many times. If it's hashed ...


0

Currently you seem to be using a Password Based KDF (PBKDF); you are using PBKDF2, as defined in Rfc2898. You don't need to do this as randomly generated data is already fine for creating an AES key. So - as you don't need a PBKDF - you don't actually need a salt. If you need more keys or key data then what is actually required is a Key Based KDF (KBKDF), ...


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The article you linked to explains everyting Salt concatenated with i encoded as a big-endian 32-bit integer So, || is concatenation, INT_32_BE is a function that encodes the 32 bit integer i as big endian. On a big endian system, INT_32_BE would do nothing. On a little endian architecture, it would do the encoding. i goes from 1 to dklen/hlen. ...



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