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The reason we add salts to the key derivation process it to make the key hash image unique for a given password. Actually a salt is added to remove weakness when an attacker has a list of "most common password". Adding a salt make the attacker job harder, he has to rebuild the attack per every salt he finds, i.e.: per every ciphertext he gets. It is ...


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As Trevis says, it's at least as safe: there's a simple reduction from the salted to the non-salted MAC, assuming the latter is secure in the standard "existential unforgeability under chosen message attacks". Assuming the adversary has full control of the salt, it also won't buy you anything security wise. In a slightly different setting, where the salt ...


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Safe, yes, but it doesn't really give you anything. The only use for a salt is to mitigate precomputation attacks against a password. Since it is public, it gives you no extra MAC security. By the property of the MAC, no adversary can forge one without knowing the key, and by the security of your KDF (which includes the salt) no one should be able to get ...



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