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No, scrypt in not vulnerable to password extension attacks. Internally, scrypt passes the password to PBKDF2, which uses it as a key for the HMAC function -- hence they've effectively already done the workaround you thought of.


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Probably because a simple cascade would only be stronger against some attacks, while opening the door to more implementation bugs. While bcrypt and scrypt are (password based) key-derivation functions, much of what is in the answers to this question about combining hash functions applies here. Different constructions give preimage resistance and PRF-ness, ...


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Can formulae for equivalent year cost be constructed to determine the parameters as functions of time since those tests were performed? Yes, but you have to make a lot of assumptions. First, though, note that the paper says: We caution again that these values are very approximate [...] Nevertheless, we believe that the estimates presented here are ...


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If you use a potentially guessable username as the salt, you should add a global salt that no other services or programs will be likely to use for scrypt. For example, a long random number. That ensures that attacking another user database does not simultaneously allow attacking your users' hashes. However, if two users are allowed to choose the same ...


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If you're using node, node scrypt does this much nicer than your standard Nrp parameters: scrypt.params(maxtime, maxmem, maxmemfrac, function(err, scryptParameters) { // scryptParameters contains the standard Nrp generated based on your inputs }); This way you can control your parameters in a much more understandable way, putting limits on how much ...


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Server shouldn't know plain password If the user types their password into a web page in a browser, the server that hosts that web page always has the opportunity to see what password was entered. There's no cryptographic mechanism that can prevent that (at this point in time). To get around this limitation, you need to build a downloadable ...


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Some points towards an answer: Why HMAC-SHA3? HMAC and its security proofs have been devised for Merkle-Damgård hashes, and SHA3 is not one. HMAC-SHA256 would be fine (Updated per comment: the Keccak submission does endorse its use with HMAC, using a block size parameters of 576 (resp. 832, 1088, 1152) bits for the hash with output of 512 (resp 384, 256, ...


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The way the iterations work is that it roughly increases your security (in bits) by $\log_2(iterations)$. So you would still need $\frac{\log{2}}{\log{97}}\cdot (256 - \log_2(10000)) \approx 37$ characters in your password to have 256-bits of security. Think of it this way, if you have $2^{256}$ possible keys, that is an astronomically large number. Much ...



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