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12

AES has fewer rounds than Serpent so AES should be faster. The number of rounds by itself is meaningless. Some ciphers have a few complex rounds and others have many simple rounds. See my answer to Why does SHA-1 have 80 rounds? for a related explanation. There is no speed decrease with bigger key size in Serpent while there is in AES. The ...


8

First, from a direct witness of the events (i.e. myself): Serpent was indeed felt as "too slow" when compared with Rijndael, by a factor of 2 to 3. The performance of Rijndael was not the best there was on a PC (RC6 was faster) but it wasn't abysmal on any platform, especially 8-bit smartcard (contrary to, say, RC6). Serpent performance was consistently ...


7

The final report is here http://csrc.nist.gov/archive/aes/index.html. All five finalists had at least adequate security on all accounts studied during the process, but Rijndael had better performance characteristics in both software and firmware on other hardware than 32 bit processors, compared to the other finalists.


4

During the end of the contest the twofish team published a paper with their analysis where they discuss their thoughts and beliefs of what should happen. Futhermore they discuss the speed security tradeoff. Keep in mind this is a bit ago during the actual AES competition.


4

I can see based upon your question that you're not already a crypto-expert. Given that, I think the single most useful answer I can give you is this: Multiple encryption addresses a problem that mostly doesn't exist. Modern ciphers rarely get broken -- at least, not in the Swordfish sense. You're far more likely to get hit by malware or an ...


3

To answer your questions in order: You won't find test vectors for the s-boxes in the submission - the s-box functions are implementation specific optimisations, especially the bit-sliced s-box functions like the Osvik and Gladman/Simpson, which actually compute multiple s-box lookups in parallel. If you need to test your s-box implementations, I would ...


3

The reason it is taking 4 32-bit integers into the round function is because it IS a bitsliced implementation. It bitsclices 32 4-bit sboxes into 4 32-bit inputs and uses standard logical operations on the words to get the job done. The sbox you posted was not generated by Osvik, but he generated a set of optimized blitsliced sboxes for 32-bit ...


3

Your first option: Encrypted(Input) = AES256(key2, Serpent(key1, Input)) suffers from a textbook meet-in-the-middle attack. It only gives you one additional bit of security over AES alone / Serpent alone. Not a good choice if you're aiming for extra paranoia.


3

I don't think it's a bad idea - neither does Bruce Schneier. In his book Applied Cryptography, there is a section called "Cascading Multiple Block Algorithms". He basically states that provided that two distinct algorithms and two independent keys are used, then the result should be at least as difficult to break as the strongest algorithm. If Alice and ...


3

An adversary would have to first break the first scheme and then the second, so in concrete terms there is slightly added security.If it takes time $2^{80}$ to break each scheme independently, it now takes time $2^{81}$ to break both encryptions. So there is minimal added security. In computational terms, assuming the key-size are similar, this wouldn't add ...


3

During the final round of the AES contest, NIST issued a summary of the 5 finalists on the topics of security, speed, implementation, and such. That sounds like what you're looking for, see sections 3 and 5 of the paper. General ideas from the paper: Rijndael had a potentially lower security margin than Twofish and Serpent. Rijndael had better performance ...


2

Block ciphers are already built of multiple components: AES = fixed 8-bit sbox, MDS matrix multiplication, 8-bit rotations Twofish = key dependent sboxes, MDS matrix, 1 and 8-bit rotations, PHT Chaining ciphers adds more components, more rounds, more complexity Depending on chaining implementation, a different IV is not required for each cipher. For ...



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