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Sending a hashed password adds no value. Consider this, what the client sends after the hash is what the server considers as a password. Additionally; you are leaking an implementation detail on the client. SSL/TLS already ensure channel security; and then using a slow password hashing algorithm has already been proven to work. Precomputing the hash does not ...


11

Short answer: don't. Use a password hash like PBKDF2, scrypt or bcrypt. Also, if at all possible, use a library that takes care of the low level stuff like password database for you. E.g. passlib might work if you use Python. I'm sorry if that sounds blunt, but that's how it is. To answer your actual questions: There is just only one thing which ...


8

MD5 and SHA-1 have a lot in common; SHA-1 was clearly inspired on either MD5 or MD4, or both (SHA-1 is a patched version of SHA-0, which was published in 1993, while MD5 was described as a RFC in 1992). The main structural differences are the following: SHA-1 has a larger state: 160 bits vs 128 bits. SHA-1 has more rounds: 80 vs 64. SHA-1 rounds have an ...


5

As shown in the paper Ricky Demer linked in the comments, HMAC can be secure even when the underlying hash function is not collision resistant. Only PRF-ness of the hash function is required, and SHA-1 is not known to lack it. Or a couple of other conditions can suffice even if it isn't a PRF. Intuitively, it makes sense that HMAC is secure as a MAC even ...



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