Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

24

SHA-512 truncated to 256 bits is as safe as SHA-256 as far as we know. The NIST did basically that with SHA-512/256 introduced March 2012 in FIPS 180-4 (because it is faster than SHA-256 when implemented in software on many 64-bit CPUs). SHA-224 is just as safe as using 224 bits of SHA-256, because that's basically how SHA-224 is constructed. What bits are ...


22

It would be very freakish if it turned out to be true. It is not an expected property of SHA-512 to have such bijectivity. It would be worrisome, even, because that's a kind of structure that should not appear in a proper cryptographic hash function. Actually proving that SHA-512, for 512-bit blocks, is not bijective, would already be a kind of a problem. ...


15

No. The wikipedia article is in my honest opinion misrepresenting this article on a reduced round attack on the SHA-2 family of hashes. Although these attacks improve upon the existing reduced round SHA-2 attacks, they do not threaten the security of the full SHA-2 family. In other words, no collisions have been found in any of the SHA-2 hashes. The ...


12

In short, no. So, what is the current state of cryptanalysis with SHA-1 (for reference only as this question relates to SHA-2) and SHA-2? Bruce Schneier has declared SHA-1 broken. That is because researchers found a way to break full SHA-1 in $2^{69}$ operations. Much less than the $2^{80}$ operations it should take to find a collision due to the birthday ...


11

If you want to use Skein (one of the SHA-3 candidates) anyway: it has a "mode of operation" (configuration variant) for tree hashing, which works just like your method 2. It does this internally of the operation, as multiple calls of UBI on the individual blocks. This is described in section 3.5.6 of the Skein specification paper (version 1.3). You will ...


10

Well, as far as we know, the mode you suggest should be secure. Now, to be honest, AES256 versus your mode isn't quite a fair comparison; your mode gives somewhat less theoretical security; if you encrypt a known $2^n$ block message, the key can be recovered with $2^{256-n}$ effort; however, this observation doesn't really affect the practical security. ...


10

SHA-224, part of FIPS 180 since FIPS 180-3 FIPS 180-2 change notice 1 of 2004, was introduced to match the second of the security strengths {80, 112, 128, 192, 256} defined in the document that became NIST Special Publication 800-57 – Recommendation for Key Management – Part 1: General (Revision 3). That security strength itself was kept ...


10

Would you use HMAC-SHA1 or HMAC-SHA256 for message authentication? Yes. That is a semi-serious answer; both are very good choices, assuming, of course, that a Message Authentication Code is the appropriate solution (that is, both sides share a secret key), and you don't need extreme speed. How much HMAC-SHA256 is slower than HMAC-SHA1? Those ...


9

With the message padding scheme of SHA-2/SHA-256 as it stands (add one 1 bit, a minimal number of 0 bits so that the overall padded message will end on a block boundary, then the original message length over some fixed number of bits), I know no attack enabled by allowing a different IV. However, allowing an arbitrary IV renders ineffective one of the two ...


9

Actually a tree-based hashing as you describe it (your method 2) somewhat lowers resistance to second preimages. For a hash function with a n-bit output, we expect resistance to: collisions up to 2n/2 effort, second preimages up to 2n, preimages up to 2n. "Effort" is here measured in number of invocations of the hash function on a short, "elementary" ...


8

The initial hash values for SHA-512 are the 64-bit binary expansion of the fractional part of the square root of the 9th through 16th primes (23, 29, 31, ..., 53). That is: $$I_0 = \left \lfloor \mathrm{frac} \left (\sqrt{23} \right ) · 2^{64} \right \rfloor$$ $$I_1 = \left \lfloor \mathrm{frac} \left (\sqrt{29} \right ) · 2^{64} \right \rfloor$$ $$\cdots$$ ...


8

No, because even SHA-512 was considered overkill from a security perspective. It has 256-bit collision resistance, which is unbreakable. (The link is about keys but a similar argument applies.) If you think large quantum computers will be efficient, a 512-bit hash makes some sense, but even then a 1024-bit one wouldn't. A quantum computer requires ...


7

The definitions given in FIPS 180-4 are $$\mathtt{Maj}(x, y, z)=(x∧y)⊕(x∧z)⊕(y∧z)$$ $$\mathtt{Ch}(x,y,z)=(x∧y)⊕(¬x∧z)$$ where $∧$ is bitwise AND, $⊕$ is bitwise exclusive-OR, and $¬$ is bitwise negation. The functions are defined for bit vectors (of 32 bits in case fo SHA-256). I'm positive $\mathtt{Maj}$ stands for majority: the result is set according to ...


7

Your cipher looks a bit like the output feedback mode of operation for block ciphers. While OFB for block ciphers is considered safe (as long as it is used right), OFB for a hash function like you are using it has the problem that the key is only used at the start, to generate the "initialization vector", not at each step of the algorithm. Thus, as ...


7

First of all, this no block cypher at all. It's a stream cypher. Thus you can use every key only once, and you can't use any cypher modes built on block cyphers. Your scheme is vulnerable to a known plaintext attack. If the attacker knows 32 aligned(or 63 unaligned) bytes of plaintext, he can calculate the state of your cypher: $ S_i = P_i \oplus C_i $ ...


7

Well, SHA-1 and SHA-256 are both limited to inputs of no more than $2^{64}-1$ bits; the HMAC architecture itself prepends a logical IPAD (which is 512 bits); hence both HMAC-SHA160 and HMAC-SHA256 are both limited to inputs of no more than $2^{64} - 513$ bits, which is about 2 exabytes. I rather suspect that this is not a serious limitation to your ...


7

In early years of hash function design it was unclear how to choose constants (not only initial vectors), and it was widely assumed that the more random they look, the more secure the function is. There is still not much research in this direction. However, there have been several attacks (rotational cryptanalysis, slide attacks, internal difference attacks) ...


6

If the hash function is any good, then it should behave as a "random function" (i.e. a function chosen randomly and uniformly among all possible functions). For a random function with output size $n$ bits, it is expected that nested application will follow a "rho" pattern: the sequence of successive values ultimately enters a cycle with an expected size of ...


6

Revised: The proposed construction is just fine, and in particular: at least as secure as SHA-256 against collision attacks, that is the ability for an adversary to construct two files with the same hash; likely about as secure as SHA-256 against both first and second preimage attacks, that is the ability for an adversary to construct (for first preimage) ...


6

No. Cryptographic hash functions model a random function, not a random permutation. A significant fraction of output hash values are expected to be unreachable and another fraction have multiple preimages. While bijectivity in general does not mean that the inverse is easy to calculate, for the types of constructs which are used in hash functions in ...


6

The attack which you link to, on ECDSA, is related to the following: the signer computes several values $kG$, for random $k$ values chosen uniformly modulo $n$ ($n$ is the size of the subgroup generated by $G$). One such value is generated for each signature. It is important that the selection is uniform: even small biases can be exploited in order to make a ...


5

Essentially yes, they do. Depending on the exact hash function you choose depends on the length of output you'd expect. For example, SHA256 produces 256 bits of output. This does then beg the question "but the length of the hash is fixed and there are infinite possible inputs??!!". That's correct, except that $2^{256}$ is ...


5

The CTR mode of encryption is defined in general for any cryptographically strong pseudo-random function (PRF). You can build such a PRF from a hash function. For CTR, you produce a key stream by concatenating: $$F(k,0) || F(k,1) || ... || F(k,m)$$ where $F$ is your secure PRF, $k$ is your key, and $m$ is the the length of your plaintext divided by the ...


5

The following table provides a nice "Comparison of SHA functions". via https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SHA-2#Comparison_of_SHA_functions


5

The Secure Hash Standard and corresponding FIPS-180/202 do not specify any hash to meet a security requirement above 256-bits (using a 512-bit hash). This is unlikely to change. SHA-2 was built with state and word sizes to meet the security requirements on commodity computers (x86 and Alpha), which use 32 and 64-bit maximum CPU word sizes for general ...


5

What you are describing is essentially the same things as a hash list. A hash list is a sequence of hashes over which another hash is calculated. Your scheme does the same thing after sorting. The sorting won't matter for the security of the scheme; it won't increase the chance of collisions. Hash lists are also used for a well known structure called a ...


5

The main thing that makes HMAC secure in typical use even with MD5 is that it is used with a secret key. That means only preimage attacks are really relevant, since finding a collision is always an online attack if you don't know the key. With known attacks the preimage resistance of both MD5 and SHA-1 is > 100 bits. Additionally, HMAC may be secure even ...


4

Method 2 is no less secure than method 1. Here's why: the cryptographical property that a hash function possesses is that it is supposed to be computationally infeasible to find any two distinct preimages that hash to the same value. Method 1 relies on this directly. However, if we were to have an example of a collision with method 2, this implies that ...


4

Check out "Analysis of SHA-1 in Encryption Mode", Handschuh, Knudsen, and Robshaw (2001), and some of the papers that cite it. They give some evidence that the answer to your question might be "yes".


4

Yes, that's their idea. You can rely on it.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible