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8

No, because even SHA-512 was considered overkill from a security perspective. It has 256-bit collision resistance, which is unbreakable. (The link is about keys but a similar argument applies.) If you think large quantum computers will be efficient, a 512-bit hash makes some sense, but even then a 1024-bit one wouldn't. A quantum computer requires ...


5

What you are describing is essentially the same things as a hash list. A hash list is a sequence of hashes over which another hash is calculated. Your scheme does the same thing after sorting. The sorting won't matter for the security of the scheme; it won't increase the chance of collisions. Hash lists are also used for a well known structure called a ...


3

The Secure Hash Standard and corresponding FIPS-180/202 do not specify any hash to meet a security requirement above 256-bits (using a 512-bit hash). This is unlikely to change. SHA-2 was built with state and word sizes to meet the security requirements on commodity computers (x86 and Alpha), which use 32 and 64-bit maximum CPU word sizes for general ...


2

SHA is related to AES in that they are both US government standards. They are not similar algorithmically. SHA and AES are cryptographic primitives, TLS is a protocol. As the name describes SHA is a family of hash algorithms. AES is a block cipher. TLS uses many encryption algorithms, including AES in various modes, and several hash algorithms, including ...



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